EARS AND TAILS AND COMMON SENSE: More Stories from the Caribbean by Philip M. & Hilary Sherlock

EARS AND TAILS AND COMMON SENSE: More Stories from the Caribbean

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Like Iguana's Tail (KR, 1969), these eight stories are set in a fictional framework -- here, a forest party lasting a week and a day, at which the animals tell each other one story a night. As such a scheme might suggest, none of this is as direct, natural, or brisk as oral literature should be, and though the situations are light -- Anansi tricks his rivals in a grass-cutting contest; rabbit (the hero here) gets the best of tiger or saves the others from the witch Old Woman Krim -- the telling never makes it seem as lively as the antics ought to. Then, too, there is the running chatter about the presence of man, a worrisome newcomer to the area -- but as nothing comes of that except an agreement to be watchful, this motif itself seems a pointless intrusion. Additional.

Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1974
Publisher: T.Y. Crowell