CAESAR, COCK OF THE VILLAGE by Philippe Dumas

CAESAR, COCK OF THE VILLAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Philippe Dumas is a considerable artist--as a watercolor miniaturist, stronger (because more individual, more flavored) than Peter Spier; and if only we could see the weathercock, down from his perch, actually pursued through the French village (instead of seeing only the villagers pursuing him), this might be recommended as a wordless book, a hilarious chase from garden to cafe to barn to blacksmith to butcher. . . that's also a tour of an old-fashioned French village. But after the weathercock lands in the church garden, he's not seen again, only heard; and his very first speech is apt to turn most youngsters off: ""I thought to myself: The priest must be a very kindhearted soul for he is always preaching about loving your neighbor. But Lent was only just over, and Heaven only knows what a clergyman's stomach is capable of after fasting for forty days."" Fortunately, the weather cock hasn't time for lengthy ruminations once the chase starts, but never is his speech free of mannerisms, and not till near the end does it tighten up. And that remains a serious flaw since, all the way through to his return to the steeple, we're expected (in the absence of seeing him) to put ourselves in his place.

Pub Date: Jan. 28th, 1980
Publisher: Prentice-Hall