FARMER IN A BUSINESS SUIT by

FARMER IN A BUSINESS SUIT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In contrast to Edward Higbee's study The American (see p. 165, 1957) this is a cumulative definition of the sharp new trends in the business of farming, as the authors call it, identified by the merging of lands and running of farms as corporations and by the related trades of food processing and machinery manufacture which have become quite as big as farming itself. The approach is a personal one, done almost completely through one family, the Yeomans, Americans since 1633.-- From the day of John Yeoman, a completely self sufficient resident, to mid-twentieth century when Carl, in Oregon, has made his farm into a profitable concern for several shareholders, we are given a cross section of the transitions from an earthbound economy to one in which business and agriculture have become too closely related to tell them apart. Specific examples- of farm financing, growing legal measures, social changes, scientific discoveries such as Burbank's and new sales methods such as Pillsbury's- show 19th century agronomy in contrast to 20th in recognizable terms. The final move to agribusiness after the Depression can be typified by the trend of people on marginal farms to leave their unfruitful lands for work with farm machinery or large cooperatives. A forthright book with a punchy narrative designed to be read by agribusinessmen and- as a limited study- a good supplement to the extensive and more definitive Higbee volume.

Pub Date: May 17th, 1957
Publisher: Simon & Schuster