NEVER ALONE by Phyllis Hobe

NEVER ALONE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Basically a spiritual tract which describes the condition of being alone as a time when God ""challenges"" one to ""become the person He created."" Hobe's thesis is that a life on one's own can encourage a woman (and, to some extent, a man) to stop being the person other people expect and to finally develop into the person one really is. She directs her message almost exclusively to women, partly because they outnumber men by nearly eight million and are hence more likely to live on their own, but chiefly because she draws on her own adjustment to being alone after divorce at 50. At first, she felt God disapproved of her as a divorcee. But she gradually came to believe He wanted her to take advantage of the opportunities for development and the new experiences available to her. She, in a sense, found herself after having spent her life living up to other people's expectations. She assumes this is the case with many other women, and she discusses the experience of several she has personally known. A few of these have actually experienced a spiritual transformation similar to her own. Most, however, are still coming to terms with a life without marriage or to the loss of a husband. This little book reads like a comforting sermon. For the spiritually inclined, it will be a guide and inspiration. Others will find it too pat; of little use in coping with life's daily grind.

Pub Date: Sept. 2nd, 1986
Publisher: Macmillan