SPECIAL DELIVERY

A BOOK'S JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD

Will elegantly satisfy the curiosity of children always asking how things work.

This book goes on a journey.

Using simplified explanations, readers trace a book called Special Delivery as it travels from an overseas factory. It’s Jay’s birthday in a little over a month, but the story immediately pivots away from the cheerful, brown-skinned child who has an interest in robots, guitar, and all manner of transportation. The real story starts in a sunlit factory surrounded by trees, with Chinese characters on signs and solar panels on the roof, while smiling people work on an assembly line, pack crates of books onto a truck, and deliver them to a dock to be loaded on a container ship. Many of the diverse workers throughout are named and individualized, personalizing these often opaque systems and subtly teaching children about everything from jobs to international trade networks. Bright, blocky illustrations depict a wide variety of heavy machinery, sure to enthrall children who can’t get enough of trains, boats, and cranes. The story ends with the postal system, a local bookstore, and Jay and his loving family, an excellent reminder of the interconnectedness of things and people. Backmatter provides more details sure to delight nonfiction-obsessed kids who are hungry to learn more about global industry and technology. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Will elegantly satisfy the curiosity of children always asking how things work. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 4, 2023

ISBN: 978-1-5362-2985-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Jan. 11, 2023

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2023

HELLO AUTUMN!

Bruce Goldstone’s Awesome Autumn (2012) is still the gold standard.

Rotner follows Hello Spring (2017) with this salute to the fall season.

Name a change seen in northern climes in fall, and Rotner likely covers it here, from plants, trees, and animals to the food we harvest: seeds are spread, the days grow shorter and cooler, the leaves change and fall (and are raked up and jumped in), some animals migrate, and many families celebrate Halloween and Thanksgiving. As in the previous book, the photographs (presented in a variety of sizes and layouts, all clean) are the stars here, displaying both the myriad changes of the season and a multicultural array of children enjoying the outdoors in fall. These are set against white backgrounds that make the reddish-orange print pop. The text itself uses short sentences and some solid vocabulary (though “deep sleep” is used instead of “hibernate”) to teach readers the markers of autumn, though in the quest for simplicity, Rotner sacrifices some truth. In several cases, the addition of just a few words would have made the following oversimplified statements reflect reality: “Birds grow more feathers”; “Cranberries float and turn red.” Also, Rotner includes the statement “Bees store extra honey in their hives” on a page about animals going into deep sleep, implying that honeybees hibernate, which is false.

Bruce Goldstone’s Awesome Autumn (2012) is still the gold standard. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3869-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: June 26, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2017

HELLO WINTER!

A solid addition to Rotner’s seasonal series. Bring on summer.

Rotner follows up her celebrations of spring and autumn with this look at all things winter.

Beginning with the signs that winter is coming—bare trees, shorter days, colder temperatures—Rotner eases readers into the season. People light fires and sing songs on the solstice, trees and plants stop growing, and shadows grow long. Ice starts to form on bodies of water and windows. When the snow flies, the fun begins—bundle up and then build forts, make snowballs and snowmen (with eyebrows!), sled, ski (nordic is pictured), skate, snowshoe, snowboard, drink hot chocolate. Animals adapt to the cold as well. “Birds grow more feathers” (there’s nothing about fluffing and air insulation) and mammals, more hair. They have to search for food, and Rotner discusses how many make or find shelter, slow down, hibernate, or go underground or underwater to stay warm. One page talks about celebrating holidays with lights and decorations. The photos show a lit menorah, an outdoor deciduous tree covered in huge Christmas bulbs, a girl next to a Chinese dragon head, a boy with lit luminarias, and some fireworks. The final spread shows signs of the season’s shift to spring. Rotner’s photos, as always, are a big draw. The children are a marvelous mix of cultures and races, and all show their clear delight with winter.

A solid addition to Rotner’s seasonal series. Bring on summer. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3976-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Aug. 13, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2018

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