THE STORY OF GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY by Powel Mills Dawley

THE STORY OF GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

At the point when the oldest and in some respects most influential theological seminary of the Episcopal church is celebrating its one hundred and fiftieth anniversary, the sub-dean of the institution has written an account of its founding and development. The narrative is well supported by research and written in an interesting style. General Seminary, as it is known among churchmen and seminary circles, came into existence at a time when the Episcopal church was at a low point in its fortunes, trying on the one hand to overcome the heritage of its Anglican antecedents and on the other, to avoid the emotionalism of revival religion on which more indigenous sects and denominations were rising rapidly. Its history is told largely in terms of the men who were prominent in its founding and its subsequent experiences. The subjects threading through the years are those-that form the story of every educational institution--the struggle for funds, for faculty, for buildings and facilities, and the response made to issues arising with the times--slavery and the Civil War, ""high church"" leanings, curricular changes, and the like. This history of a prominent theological institution should be of interest to readers beyond its own alumni and denomination, including seminary leaders, church historians, and historians of American culture.

Pub Date: April 23rd, 1969
Publisher: Oxford