PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The Bennetts administer a highly informative and entertaining smack down to get your head on straight."
Psychiatrist Michael Bennett and his comedy-writer daughter, Sarah, combine to demonstrate "why self-improvement is hard and sometimes impossible, even when we're strong-willed and well guided." Read full book review >
SELF AND SOUL by Mark Edmundson
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Though Shakespeare fans may feel defensive, Edmundson delivers a welcome championing of humanistic ways of thinking and living."
What happens in the rush to gain the world? We lose our souls, of course—and, Edmundson (English/Univ. of Virginia; Why Football Matters, 2014, etc.) adds, our ideals to boot. Read full book review >

A Convergence of Two Minds by Randolph R. Croxton
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 30, 2015

"A thought-provoking explanation for the origins of personality."
In this nonfiction work, Croxton argues that modern human minds succeed through the interaction of the distinctly male and female hemispheres of the brain. Read full book review >
THE SUPERHUMAN MIND by Berit Brogaard
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Fruitful reading for devout self-improvers, though Maria Konnikova's Mastermind (2013), which covers some of the same ground, is more appealing and better written."
Another in a long line of you-can-be-Einstein treatises, blending hard neuroscience with parlor tricks. Read full book review >
IN THE MIND FIELDS by Casey Schwartz
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Schwartz does not provide all the answers, but her highly readable report raises intriguing questions about the limitations and the futures of both psychoanalysis and neuroscience."
Can psychoanalysis and neuroscience, each with its own distinct methods, one subjective, one objective, make peace with one another? Can the mind be understood by looking closely into the brain? Read full book review >

NEUROTRIBES by Steve Silberman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"In the foreword, Oliver Sacks writes that this 'sweeping and penetrating history…is fascinating reading' that 'will change how you think of autism.' No argument with that assessment."
A well-researched, readable report on the treatment of autism that explores its history and proposes significant changes for its future. Read full book review >
RISING STRONG by Brené Brown
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An innovative one-two-three-punch approach to self-help and healing from an author who has helped countless readers change their lives."
More solid advice from the author of Daring Greatly (2012) and The Gifts of Imperfection (2010).Read full book review >
THE GRATITUDE DIARIES by Janice Kaplan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"Simple, effective procedures that can be easily incorporated into even the busiest lifestyle."
How a year of being thankful led to big changes in a woman's life. Read full book review >
TRIUMPH OF THE HEART by Megan Feldman Bettencourt
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Bettencourt takes a broad view of opportunities small and large for forgiveness, and in doing so, she provides hope for a way forward that focuses more on acceptance than retribution."
One writer's journey through learning about the many forms forgiveness can take. Read full book review >
COLLABORATIVE INTELLIGENCE by Dawna Markova
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Provocative but open to the charge of one-sided overcorrection."
Consultant Markova (Wide Open: On Living with Purpose and Passion, 2008, etc.) and co-author McArthur argue that current thinking about leadership methods must change in the coming century.Read full book review >
UPSIDE by Jim Rendon
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Rendon offers not just a spoonful of medicine, but also a furtherance of works by Frankl, Abraham Maslow, and his new, revitalized acquaintances."
Journalist Rendon examines the question of how trauma changes people, reshaping their lives and senses of self. Read full book review >
THE MAN IN THE MONSTER by Martha Elliott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A disturbing and multifaceted exposé of both a ruthless killer and the sympathetic, merciful journalist at odds with his capital fate."
The story of a journalist's decadelong friendship with a convicted serial rapist and murderer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >