THE INKBLOTS by Damion Searls
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Searls shows persuasively how the creation and reinvention of inkblots has reflected psychologists' scientific and cultural perspectives."
A history of 20th-century psychology focused on the life, work, and legacy of the inventor of the inkblot test. Read full book review >
TELL ME EVERYTHING YOU DON'T REMEMBER by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A fascinating exploration of personal identity from a writer whose body is, thankfully, 'no longer at war.'"
The stroke that hit Lee at age 33 left no visible signs of trauma, but it still changed her life forever. Read full book review >

CAN'T JUST STOP by Sharon Begley
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Due to Begley's dense explanations of brain science, the book requires close attention at times, but her captivating, accessible anecdotes of individual cases lead to unforgettable scenarios."
Science journalist Begley (Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain, 2007, etc.) delves into specific types of compulsive behaviors while also positing a grand theory of what links seemingly disparate obsessions. Read full book review >
THE PERPETUAL NOW by Michael D. Lemonick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An absolutely memorable book."
A veteran science journalist uses the story of Lonni Sue Johnson, a young woman who suffered a severe infection that destroyed her hippocampus, to illuminate his journey into the murky subject of memory itself. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A lively and edifying narrative with lessons for today."
In her first book, Purnell gets our nerve endings tingling with an exploration of the interplay of mind and body as seen through the lens of the Enlightenment. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Schuman's droll, self-deprecating, wild life (so far) will find particular appeal with readers who enjoy memoirs that don't take themselves too seriously."
The candid adventures of a plucky, German-obsessed American student. Read full book review >
STRETCH by Scott Sonenshein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A convincing argument within a compelling narrative—recommended for business managers and resourceful individuals alike."
A social scientist examines inventive ways that individuals and organizations can build on their existing resources to achieve remarkable results. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY BRAIN by Stephan Guyenet
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A helpful guide offering encouragement to those looking for ways to lead healthier lives."
Obesity researcher and health writer Guyenet seeks an answer to why, "between 1980 and the present, the U.S. obesity rate more than doubled" despite our national obsession with dieting. Read full book review >
HIT MAKERS by Derek Thompson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Good reading for anyone who aspires to understand the machinery of pop culture—and perhaps even craft a hit of his or her own."
How does a nice idea become an earworm, or a fashion trend, or—shudder—a meme? Atlantic senior editor Thompson ventures a few well-considered answers. Read full book review >
FROM BACTERIA TO BACH AND BACK by Daniel C. Dennett
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Anyone interested in modern theories of the mind and consciousness has to reckon with Dennett. This book, dense but accessible, is as good a place as any to start."
The dean of consciousness-raising consciousness-explaining returns with another cleareyed exploration of the mind. Read full book review >
THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY by Daphne Merkin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2017

"It's hard to find much solace within the relentless gloom—however insightfully explored—of one writer's depression."
A writer reflects on her unceasing struggle with clinical depression. Read full book review >
FRAUD by Edward J. Balleisen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A touch arid at times, but overall a fascinating, illuminating look at bunko and the social conditions under which its practitioners operate—and flourish."
A broad-ranging study of the big swindle in American life over the last couple of centuries. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >