Psychology Book Reviews (page 10)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Clear, easily digestible pop psychology."
A guide to defending oneself from narcissism in the selfie age. Read full book review >
BIG MAGIC by Elizabeth Gilbert
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Not earth shattering but warmly inspirational."
The bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love reflects on what it means to pursue a creative life.Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A lively, balanced re-examination of the traditional mind-body issue in light of modern advances in neuroscience."
"We do not have bodies, we are bodies," writes Claxton (Emeritus, Learning Sciences/Univ. of Winchester; The Wayward Mind: An Intimate History of the Unconscious, 2005, etc.) in this challenge to the contemporary view of what it means to be intelligent. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Strong medical research and firsthand accounts provide evidence that playing games can make you a healthier, happier, more confident person."
New strategies to create a great life through the power of games. Read full book review >
THIRTY MILLION WORDS by Dana Suskind
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Informative, exciting new data that confirms the significant benefits gained by talking to your child."
New research demonstrating the importance of communicating with your child right from birth. Read full book review >

Depression Delusion Volume One by Terry Lynch
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 2, 2015

"An eye-opening look at how a singular theory of depression has pervaded and persuaded the medical world."
In this first of three planned volumes, an Irish doctor and psychotherapist discusses the lack of scientific evidence for a long-held, widespread theory of depression. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The Bennetts administer a highly informative and entertaining smack down to get your head on straight."
Psychiatrist Michael Bennett and his comedy-writer daughter, Sarah, combine to demonstrate "why self-improvement is hard and sometimes impossible, even when we're strong-willed and well guided." Read full book review >
SELF AND SOUL by Mark Edmundson
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Though Shakespeare fans may feel defensive, Edmundson delivers a welcome championing of humanistic ways of thinking and living."
What happens in the rush to gain the world? We lose our souls, of course—and, Edmundson (English/Univ. of Virginia; Why Football Matters, 2014, etc.) adds, our ideals to boot. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"A heartfelt but narrow prescription for finding a partner and creating a loving heterosexual marriage."
A Christianity-based approach to relationships driven by positive thinking, based on the authors' own courtship and marriage. Read full book review >
A Convergence of Two Minds by Randolph R. Croxton
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 30, 2015

"A thought-provoking explanation for the origins of personality."
In this nonfiction work, Croxton argues that modern human minds succeed through the interaction of the distinctly male and female hemispheres of the brain. Read full book review >
THE SUPERHUMAN MIND by Berit Brogaard
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Fruitful reading for devout self-improvers, though Maria Konnikova's Mastermind (2013), which covers some of the same ground, is more appealing and better written."
Another in a long line of you-can-be-Einstein treatises, blending hard neuroscience with parlor tricks. Read full book review >
IN THE MIND FIELDS by Casey Schwartz
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Schwartz does not provide all the answers, but her highly readable report raises intriguing questions about the limitations and the futures of both psychoanalysis and neuroscience."
Can psychoanalysis and neuroscience, each with its own distinct methods, one subjective, one objective, make peace with one another? Can the mind be understood by looking closely into the brain? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >