Psychology Book Reviews (page 10)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 17, 2014

"Human emotions are dissected in great detail, but few new insights are revealed."
A no-nonsense guide to helping readers learn more about their feelings. Read full book review >
ENCHANTED OBJECTS by David Rose
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 15, 2014

"A fine tour d'horizon of innovative enchantment and its ground rules and responsibilities."
MIT Media Lab instructor Rose explores the ramifications of the coming human-machine interface as it impacts the designs of and experiences we have with the things in our lives. Read full book review >

SUSPICIOUS MINDS by Ian Gold
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 8, 2014

"A provocative new perspective on the diagnosis, and therefore treatment, of mental illness."
Brothers Joel Gold (Psychiatry/NYU School of Medicine) and Ian Gold (Philosophy and Psychiatry/McGill Univ.) suggest that to treat delusions simply as manifestations of psychosis, without regard to their cognitive function, is insufficient. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 1, 2014

"Hope for the endurance of the human spirit in the face of tragedy."
Two psychologists provide a nontechnical exploration of how certain people not only survive trauma, but actually thrive after a traumatic experience. Read full book review >
Why Can't Johnny Just Quit? by Kyle Oh
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 20, 2014

"A fascinating, realistic study of pain management and addiction that offers hope to patients and their families."
A physiatrist and pain management specialist analyzes the intricacies of addiction and pain. Read full book review >

OUR NECESSARY SHADOW by Tom Burns
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 15, 2014

"A responsible, evenhanded exploration of a highly provocative medical industry."
A comprehensive history and analysis of the practice of psychiatry. Read full book review >
HOW NOT TO BE WRONG by Jordan Ellenberg
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 3, 2014

"Witty and expansive, Ellenberg's math will leave readers informed, intrigued and armed with plenty of impressive conversation starters."
It's time to drop the idea that mathematics is an esoteric field best left to a few academics. In fact, writes Ellenberg (Mathematics/Univ. of Wisconsin), the truth is better: Math is everywhere, and the knowledge it yields can benefit everyone. Read full book review >
It's Not Your Fault by Cay Shea Hellervik
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 22, 2014

"Promising but ultimately unconvincing guidance for addressing a challenging familial and social issue."
An innovative at-home program for juvenile offenders. Read full book review >
KIDDING OURSELVES by Joseph T. Hallinan
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 20, 2014

"A genial, occasionally glib guide to both the positive and negative effects of self-delusion."
A breezy, anecdotal survey of self-deception and how it is not merely inevitable, but helpful and even essential. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 13, 2014

"Upbeat and optimistic, Levitt and Dubner hope that by thinking 'a bit differently, a bid harder, a bit more freely,' readers will be able 'to go out and right some wrong, to ease some burden.'"
Co-authors Levitt (Economics/Univ. of Chicago) and journalist Dubner (Super Freakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance, 2009, etc.) continue on their mission to get people to think in new ways in this lively book about decision and persuasion. Read full book review >
THE HOOPS WHISPERER by Idan Ravin
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 5, 2014

"A sports book that will motivate readers to live a purposeful, authentic life."
An unlikely inspirational book by the trainer for the NBA's biggest stars. Read full book review >
THE MADWOMAN IN THE VOLVO by Sandra Tsing Loh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2014

"A funny, frank and hopeful memoir of middle age."
A writer and syndicated radio host's no-holds-barred account of how she survived the rigors of midlife crisis and menopause. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >