Psychology Book Reviews (page 10)

ONE SIMPLE IDEA by Mitch Horowitz
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A historically rich analysis of an idea that is older than many may think."
The evolution of the positive-thinking movement. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A MEDIOCRE WIDOW by Catherine Tidd
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"Tidd combines indignation and sarcasm with humility, and the result is a moving, helpful look at how to navigate the difficult times that come with tremendous loss."
"I spent my eleventh wedding anniversary planning my husband's funeral." So begins Tidd's emotional memoir of coping with life after becoming a single mother with three children at the age of 31. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"Tougher-minded readers will prefer Steven Pinker's The Better Angels of Our Nature (2011) and even Prince Kropotkin himself."
A middling look at some of the better angels of our nature by German science writer Klein (Leonardo's Legacy: How Da Vinci Reimagined the World, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >
BRAINSTORM by Daniel J. Siegel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"Smart advice, if unnecessarily repackaged, on providing the most supportive and brain-healthy environment during the tumultuous years of adolescence."
Siegel (Psychiatry/UCLA School of Medicine; Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation, 2010, etc.) tenders approaches to making adolescence work for parents rather than tearing them apart emotionally and psychologically. Read full book review >
HOW SHOULD WE LIVE? by Roman Krznaric
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"Based on human experience, helpful hints on transforming the way we live."
The title of this potent lifestyle guide poses a valid question—and, after more than three millennia, still a good one. Read full book review >

SMARTER by Dan Hurley
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"A highly accessible report on cutting-edge science with practical tips for readers bent on boosting their own intelligence."
A journalist's account of the young science of brain training. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"Powerful, eye-opening and funny. Pitch-perfect in his storytelling, Stossel reminds us that, in many important ways, to be anxious is to be human."
In this captivating and intimate book, the editor of the Atlantic spares no detail about his lifelong struggle with anxiety and contextualizes his personal experience within the history of anxiety's perception and treatment. Read full book review >
OUT OF TIME by Lynne Segal
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2013

"Segal refers to multiple cultural touchstones in service of her writing; this book should become a touchstone itself for those interested in aging."
Extended meditations on aging. Read full book review >
JUST BABIES by Paul Bloom
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"An engaging examination of human morality."
A developmental psychologist warns against a facile explanation of the origins of morality. Read full book review >
THE TELL by Matthew Hertenstein
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"An entertaining look at our oft-maligned intuitive capabilities, offering useful tips on how we may sharpen our powers of observation and increase the accuracy of our predictions."
In his debut, Hertenstein (Psychology/DePauw Univ.) contends that the predictive power of the human brain is exemplified by its ability to draw accurate conclusions "based on observations of brief samples of others' behavior." Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Suggestive but not entirely convincing. A modest addition to the popular psychology/self-help shelf."
A debunking of the popular treatments of "the alleged great [vertical] divide between the 'analytical/logical' left and 'artistic/intuitive' right halves of the human brain." Read full book review >
MORAL TRIBES by Joshua Greene
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 4, 2013

"A provocative, if Utopian, call for a new 'common currency of observable evidence…not to gain advantage over others, but simply because it's good.'"
Greene (Moral Cognition Lab/Harvard Univ.) combines insights from psychology and philosophy to illuminate "the structure of modern moral problems." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Gabrielle Zevin
March 3, 2015

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over—and see everything anew. “Zevin writes characters who grow and prosper,” our reviewer writes, “in a narrative that is sometimes sentimental, sometimes funny, sometimes true to life and always entertaining.” View video >