Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Translating emotions over time and across cultures is Miller's major methodological challenge—and he meets it with ranging and learned references, a wry and unpretentious style, and a genuine respect for the power of those ancient, forgotten sources on which modern social exchange depends."
From Vikings to valentines, crimes to dinner invitations, Miller (Law/University of Michigan) here explores the mercurial history of the emotions, attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with honor—its defense, loss, survival, and display- -drawing on evidence from the Greek epics and Icelandic sagas to contemporary horror movies. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Unsensational, frank, and—despite its outlandish subject- -having the ring of truth. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen) (First serial to the National Enquirer)"
Refreshingly low-key memoir by a crime-busting psychic. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Devotees of medical lore will find this a treasure trove."
Lively, anecdote-filled account of how culture interacts with biology to produce different sets of psychosomatic symptoms in different groups of people. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Rich character studies, plus lucid explanations of psychological concepts."
More well-told, insightful narratives from the files of psychotherapist Weinberg (Nearer to the Heart's Desire, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 1993

"A saga of psychotherapy taken to its bloody limit: fascinating and disturbing in spite of the dull, objective style adopted by each narrator."
A harrowing yet oddly diffident reconstruction of a young woman's desperate search for a self through self-mutilation, as described separately by her analyst and herself at the end of 16 years of treatment. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"A radical proposal, as polemical as it is utopian, but useful in isolating a severe, festering problem in American society, one that will require strong medicine to heal."
In no uncertain terms, social-welfare specialists Specht (UC- Berkeley) and Courtney (Univ. of Wisconsin) decry the trend toward private practice in their field over the last 50 years, demanding instead a return to community-based social programs. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 1993

"Without Beauvoir's responses, the letters reveal the trivial and commonplace preoccupations of even the most heroic of intellects in the most trying of times."
A sequel to Witness to My Life (1992), which collected Sartre's letters to Simone de Beauvoir from 1926 to 1939. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An interesting subject regrettably presented with more sensationalism than science."
An unsettling account of the pathological behavior of people who carry ``playing sick'' to bizarre extremes. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Flawed by Levine's endless snarling and a sometime sluggish style—but undeniably the real nitty-gritty at its core. (Eight- page b&w photo insert—not seen)"
Former DEA agent Levine's account of his South American sting operation to capture major cocaine traffickers—a sting, he claims, that was sabotaged by the CIA. Read full book review >
MEETING FREUD'S FAMILY by Paul Roazen
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A haphazard personal memoir that recapitulates Roazen's earlier work, evens some scores, and offers trivial scraps about the Freud museum, Anna's dogs, and Melanie Klein's relations with her daughter. (Fifteen illustrations)"
Roazen (Political Science/York University, Toronto)—having written about Freud, his disciples, his adversaries, and his position in intellectual history (Freud and His Followers, 1974, etc.)—now reminisces about his experiences preparing for these studies, his interviews with Freud's relatives and associates, and their quarrels with each other and with him. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A chilling, eye-opening report—and a call to action."
A fascinating, if terrifying, look at psychopaths: the often charming, glib, sane-seeming people who rape and murder—and rip- off S&Ls—without a second's thought because they utterly lack the emotions that add up to the defining human characteristic of conscience. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >