Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

GENDER AND DISCOURSE by Deborah Tannen
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1994

"This may offer intrepid Tannen fans or academicians worthy bits of information and insight, but general readers are likely to find little reward in this dense tome."
In attempt to defend and expand upon her theories of miscommunication between men and women, sociolinguist Tannen provides the scholarly underpinnings of her 1990 bestseller, You Just Don't Understand. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1994

"Though this collection suffers from a dense academic style and does not significantly build on Chodorow's previous work, it nonetheless provides a provocative reminder that these are complex issues and that humans, with their capacity for individual variation, are complicated subjects."
Feminist theorist Chodorow conducts a complex, uneven, though occasionally intriguing investigation of some of the more controversial aspects of Freud's (and others', from Klein to Lacan) work on sex, gender, and psychoanalysis. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1994

"A holistic health lecture, loaded with personal anecdotes and research data, that often sounds as though it were being delivered from a pulpit."
An ambitious, sometimes ponderous, examination of the nature of health by the director of the corporate health program at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1994

"Though Walzer could show himself more aware of some issues, especially gender and race, this is a well-argued, if not always energetic, set of carefully wrought ideas on the state of public moral debate."
Walzer (The Company of Critics, 1988, etc.) thoughtfully answers objections to his many influential volumes of social criticism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"All in all, a thoughtful, patiently assembled book that probes carefully and with moral toughness into precisely those painful truths."
As in God's Dust (1989), Buruma takes a psychological and cultural voyage into nationalism, guilt, and self-delusion — in this case, of two of WW II's defeated Axis powers. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 31, 1994

"Written for the general, but not the casual, reader, this work's extensive chapter notes on Kagan's methodology make it especially valuable to psychologists and psychiatrists."
A perceptive look at changing ideas about temperament, plus some strong opinions about the implications of current concepts. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 31, 1994

"Women Who Hurt Themselves should be helpful to mental health professionals who work with female trauma survivors, though some of its generalities should be taken with caution."
Women Who Hurt Themselves explores the suffering of women who reenact childhood trauma, particularly abuse or neglect, through self-destructive behavior. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 23, 1994

"A stimulating personal reflection on the complexities of communication between people, in whatever language or culture."
Perceptive anecdotes from Austria, India, and Mexico, from heroin-addict treatment centers, scuba dives, and linguistics conferences pepper this primer on the intricacies of cross-cultural discourse and ordinary conversation. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 16, 1994

Practical advice by psychotherapist Halpern (How to Break Your Addition to a Person, 1982) on how to end a bad relationship and expand your capacity to have a good one. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 13, 1994

"A courageous, eloquent book of great significance to all who care about where we came from."
A world-class linguist demonstrates similarities among the globe's 5,000 languages to argue the case for a single, unifying Mother Tongue. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 2, 1994

"The goal, presumably, is to enable legions of suited workers to imagine that they're really armored Lancelots, that their workstations are noble mounts, and that the business of making a living—or a widget, or an arrow—is just as heroic as the deeds of Arthurian legend."
Byham and Cox (Zapp!, not reviewed) tell a facile fable about dragon-slaying in order to spread yet another business gospel about quality, teamwork, and empowerment. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 2, 1994

"A heart-rending look at the permanent ruin war can wreak in any age."
In a brilliantly creative extended analogy, psychiatrist Shay (Tufts Medical School) persuasively argues that the experiences and behavior of traumatized Vietnam veterans echo those of Achilles in Homer's Iliad. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >