Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Shallow, pretentious, and uninformed: not only failing to make its case persuasively but debasing the very concepts of heroism it claims to make available to women."
After the eloquent title, the high rhetoric, and the elaborate heroic schema appropriated from Joseph Campbell, Noble (Psychology, Women's Studies/Univ. of Washington) offers the very antithesis of the heroic: ordinary women leaving home and family to become nuns, teachers, lesbians. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1994

"You've heard all this New Age-speak before, but the individual stories—most of them lively and fresh—save Schultz's rendering from being trite."
Mixing Jungian psychology and New Age physics with the homespun philosophies of successful entrepreneurs, business-writer Schultz (coauthor: Cashing Out, 1991—not reviewed) concludes that if you want to succeed in life, you have to be willing to follow your gut when making decisions. Read full book review >

ESSAYS IN UNDERSTANDING by Hannah Arendt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 27, 1994

"Largely 'residual reflections,' according to Kohn, these pieces appear to be quaint, irrelevant, and narrowly focused exercises, only faintly foreshadowing the 'bleak pessimism' of the 'terrible century' Arendt was later to dissect."
Compiled, edited, and briefly annotated by Hannah Arendt's longtime assistant Jerome Kohn (Political and Social Science/New School), this first of two projected volumes collecting Arendt's (1906-75) essays, addresses, and reviews up to 1954 contains two previously unpublished essays: "On the Nature of Totalitarianism" (1953) and "The Concern with Politics in Contemporary European Philosophical Thought" (1954). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"Designed for a popular audience, this is in fact a hefty read full of wonder and wisdom."
Another in a series of books (Joel Davis's Mother Tongue, p. 1303; Ray Jackendorf's Patterns in the Mind, p. 1439) popularizing Chomsky's once controversial theories explaining the biological basis of language. Read full book review >
THE SIX PILLARS OF SELF-ESTEEM by Nathaniel Branden
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Inflated and repetitious."
Yet another rehash of his favorite subject from Branden (How to Raise Your Self-Esteem, 1987, etc.), a monthly columnist for New Woman magazine. Read full book review >

FAMILY MYTHS by Joyce Block
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Clearly presented theory, amply illustrated with lengthy case histories."
An elaborate presentation of the idea that people can get locked into fictional roles by their families. Read full book review >
CAREER CRASH by Barry Glassner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Timely and readable career advice."
An affable, helpful look at the baby boomer generation's seemingly distinctive form of midlife emergency—losing a job and being unable to find another—by Glassner (Sociology/Univ. of Southern California; Bodies, 1988; Drugs in Adolescent Worlds, 1987). Read full book review >
ON FAMILIAR TERMS by Donald Keene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Keene complains of lukewarm or worse reviews of his monumental survey volume World Without Walls (1976)—but the Kirkus reviewer gave it the same high praise this memoir deserves as well."
Charming memoir by prolific specialist in Japanese literature Keene (Travelers of a Hundred Ages, 1989, etc.), who seems to have found a culture that mirrored his character traits of introversion and flight into deep study. Read full book review >
LISTENING by Hannah Merker
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Of interest both to hearing and non-hearing readers."
``I am an archeologist digging for sound, for its origins, its wondrous manifestations.'' Deafened in a skiing accident two decades ago, Merker, in lyrical, intent appreciations, plumbs the relationships between self and sound, and the webs of communication within the world—seeking ``new ways of listening for the hearing and the hearing impaired.'' To the author, deaf and despairing, a friend offered an ``experiment'' of sharing in words a world of sound, until an awareness grew of events and things with sound: a struck match; the thunder that follows lightening. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A poignant sequel to Williams's ongoing adventure, her experiences here more closely shadowing the emotional struggles of non-autistic adults."
A compelling continuation of Williams's determined struggle to break free from autism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

A provocative dual biography that sets out to recast Simone de Beauvoir as the ``true philosopher'' in her legendary relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre; by the Fullbrooks (she: Literary Studies/Univ. of the West of England; he: a freelance writer). Read full book review >
THE LIVES OF MICHEL FOUCAULT by David Macey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"A cautious and respectful study—avoiding luridness and gossip while preserving its subject's dignity—that Foucault himself might have authorized."
Elusive and private, ``the lives'' of Michel Foucault (1926- 84) include the many public roles that he assumed—as philosopher, academic, historian, political activist, and homosexual—roles that both reflected and helped shape the character of postwar France. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >