Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"A thorough diagnosis of contemporary psychiatry's intellectual lacunae, as well as its personal and institutional warts."
Klitzman, author of a highly regarded memoir of his medical internship (A Year-Long Night, 1989), offers an anecdotally rich yet critical account of his psychiatric residency. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"For the layperson, argot-free and persuasive; for the mental health professional, challenging, in both senses of the word."
An insider's probing look at the present state of the mental health professions. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"So esoteric, though, as to fatigue general readers."
``Selling Modernism'' would be a better title for this narrow- focus art-historical study of Picasso's business relations with his art dealers. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"A fascinating and well-written account."
An intelligent history of how Americans have tended to see the world as the battleground between absolute good and absolute evil. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"If, as the old saw has it, England and America are two countries divided by a common language, here's some disarming help sent by a Yank from the other side of the pond."
Ex-patriate journalist Bryson (Neither Here Nor There, 1992, etc.) skims the history and present condition of American English. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 28, 1995

"An excellent and updated review of a major trailblazer's spin on AI. (Library of Science dual main selection)"
Artificial intelligence expert Hofstadter (Gîdel, Escher, Bach, not reviewed, etc.) challenges conventional computer simulations of reasoning. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 27, 1995

"Revealing a wide curiosity, Tashjian goes beyond art history, freely zigging and zagging between high and low culture in this lively probe of issues of anxiety and influence. (86 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
DIAGNOSIS FOR DISASTER by Claudette Wassil-Grimm
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"Succeeds both as an exposÇ of a dangerous fad and as a survival guide for its victims."
A well-aimed blast at the recovered memory movement that exposes the roots of false memory syndrome and the reasons for the acceptance and persistence of the phenomenon. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"The analyses here too often boil down to conventional wisdom about art's roots in madness, but these diverse case studies of psychological disaster coupled with artistic achievement can't help but make for diverting reading."
Written from a variety of clinical viewpoints, these thumbnail sketches of notoriously unbalanced artists draw links—sometimes tenuous, sometimes provocative—between their personality disorders and their creative productions. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 11, 1995

"An unforgettable picture of a soul in torment."
A harrowing first-person, semi-fictionalized memoir of the inner life of a paranoid schizophrenic, written while its young author was in jail, mental hospitals, and halfway houses. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"There are echos of Erica Jong in this book's naive self- absorption, but Chernin's hard-core fans will find it rich with discovery."
Memories of 25 years on the couch make for a curiously compelling recounting of the rewards and shortcomings of psychoanalysis. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Over 20 years in the making, this extraordinary contribution to American intellectual history was well worth waiting for."
A prodigious history of American psychoanalysis from 1917 to 1985, wonderfully lucid and informative. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >