Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1991

"Feminists will find Bailey's discussion of the masculine orientation of standard English particularly illuminating. (Twenty illustrations—not seen.)"
Drawing on his vast erudition about the uses of language, Bailey (English Language and Literature/Univ. of Michigan), associate editor of the Oxford Companion to the English Language, describes the history of the cultural, social, political, and even psychological attitudes toward the English language. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Thoughtful, passionate, and visually exciting—a work that will unquestionably encourage others both to create meaningful monuments, buildings, gardens and to understand them. (Over 500 illustrations, including 200 color and 200 b&w photographs.)"
A brilliant distillation of the ideas of the man called by Philip Johnson ``the most influential architecture teacher ever.'' Here, Scully (Art History/Yale; Pueblo, 1974) surveys with charm, eloquence, and philosophical reflection the history of the symbolic structures that mediate between the human beings who created and use them and the natural world. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 1991

"A plodding biography of a remarkable woman."
A failed attempt to arouse interest in the work of Dorothea Dix, who, in the 19th century, devoted her considerable talents to establishing hospitals for the needy insane. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 15, 1991

"Dossey's reflections will please true believers and fans of Bernie S. Siegel or Deepak Chopra, but, though well written, they lack the rigor likely necessary to win many converts."
Highly readable essays exploring the mind-body connection by physician Dossey, who brings to the holistic health movement the experience of a practicing internist and the soul of a poet. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

Kinder (Critical Studies/USC School of Cinema-Television) argues that the ``supersystem'' comprised of TV, video games, and movies aimed at children not only urges them to buy specific products but also indoctrinates them in the ways of post-modern consumer culture. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Yet another Cartesian stage manager, as Dennett might say?"
Writing with the same infectious enthusiasm that invests his much of his other work, Ornstein (coauthor, Healthy Pleasures, 1989; Multimind, 1986, etc.) replays familiar themes, adding some new twists. Read full book review >
ON CHARACTER by James Q. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"But however appealing to readers, it presents no clear guidelines for forming character or public policy."
Elegantly written essays on elevating standards of behavior in today's world. Read full book review >
KEEPING A RENDEZVOUS by John Berger
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A too-mixed bag, unbalanced mostly by political deadweight."
Berger (The Sense of Sight, 1985, etc.) as art critic is a maddening case. Read full book review >
CREATIVE CHARACTERS by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

Author of biographies of Hannah Arendt (1982) and Anna Freud (1988) as well as the novel Virgil (1983), Young-Bruehl hits the ground running in this demanding approach to understanding creativity. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Brilliant reportage, with all the details in place—a stunning debut."
The Pulitzer-winning journalist (The Wall Street Journal, Ms., The Miami Herald) explores the real status of American women in the 90's in this powerful and long-overdue myth-buster—an instant classic and a valuable companion to Paula Kamen's Feminist Fatale (reviewed below). Read full book review >
CONSCIOUSNESS EXPLAINED by Daniel C. Dennett
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Nevertheless, Dennett's analysis is so often brilliant, so witty, and so informed by contemporary culture as to make pleasurable the reading of what is truly a complex and demanding text."
Maybe not explained. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >