Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Devotees of medical lore will find this a treasure trove."
Lively, anecdote-filled account of how culture interacts with biology to produce different sets of psychosomatic symptoms in different groups of people. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Rich character studies, plus lucid explanations of psychological concepts."
More well-told, insightful narratives from the files of psychotherapist Weinberg (Nearer to the Heart's Desire, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 1993

"A saga of psychotherapy taken to its bloody limit: fascinating and disturbing in spite of the dull, objective style adopted by each narrator."
A harrowing yet oddly diffident reconstruction of a young woman's desperate search for a self through self-mutilation, as described separately by her analyst and herself at the end of 16 years of treatment. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"A radical proposal, as polemical as it is utopian, but useful in isolating a severe, festering problem in American society, one that will require strong medicine to heal."
In no uncertain terms, social-welfare specialists Specht (UC- Berkeley) and Courtney (Univ. of Wisconsin) decry the trend toward private practice in their field over the last 50 years, demanding instead a return to community-based social programs. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 1993

"Without Beauvoir's responses, the letters reveal the trivial and commonplace preoccupations of even the most heroic of intellects in the most trying of times."
A sequel to Witness to My Life (1992), which collected Sartre's letters to Simone de Beauvoir from 1926 to 1939. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An interesting subject regrettably presented with more sensationalism than science."
An unsettling account of the pathological behavior of people who carry ``playing sick'' to bizarre extremes. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Flawed by Levine's endless snarling and a sometime sluggish style—but undeniably the real nitty-gritty at its core. (Eight- page b&w photo insert—not seen)"
Former DEA agent Levine's account of his South American sting operation to capture major cocaine traffickers—a sting, he claims, that was sabotaged by the CIA. Read full book review >
MEETING FREUD'S FAMILY by Paul Roazen
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A haphazard personal memoir that recapitulates Roazen's earlier work, evens some scores, and offers trivial scraps about the Freud museum, Anna's dogs, and Melanie Klein's relations with her daughter. (Fifteen illustrations)"
Roazen (Political Science/York University, Toronto)—having written about Freud, his disciples, his adversaries, and his position in intellectual history (Freud and His Followers, 1974, etc.)—now reminisces about his experiences preparing for these studies, his interviews with Freud's relatives and associates, and their quarrels with each other and with him. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A chilling, eye-opening report—and a call to action."
A fascinating, if terrifying, look at psychopaths: the often charming, glib, sane-seeming people who rape and murder—and rip- off S&Ls—without a second's thought because they utterly lack the emotions that add up to the defining human characteristic of conscience. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Erudite, intense, and intellectually demanding."
A spirited if scholarly examination of the nature of regret. Read full book review >
THE ROOTS OF THE SELF by Robert Ornstein
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Unusual roots, worth chewing on—but more weeding would have helped. (Illustrated with 40 cartoonish line drawings by Ted Dewan)"
From ebullient popular-science writer Ornstein (The Evolution of Consciousness, 1991, etc.): a theory of human nature, based on recent studies in child development, brain structure, personality, and genetics. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >