Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Professional colleagues may persevere, but the stilted, redundant prose may well discourage those less dedicated. (charts and diagrams)"
A dull examination of the idea that a certain set of symptoms commonly afflicts ambitious, talented young women growing up in societies that value males over females. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 12, 1995

"But when he hears of one apparently meditating on a colorful sunset, he's ready to give the brute the benefit of the doubt. (First serial to Cosmopolitan and New Age Journal; Book-of-the- Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selections; author tour)"
Who says that wolves show no compassion, that ants are clueless when it comes to rage, that crows don't enjoy a good wheeze—in short, that animals other than humans don't have emotions—demands Masson (My Father's Guru, 1992, etc.) in this entertaining, if undefinitive, collection of soulful animal tales. Read full book review >

XY by Elisabeth Badinter
NON-FICTION
Released: May 4, 1995

"Disciples of psychoanalytic theory will delight in Badinter's proposed resolution to modernity's lost masculinity, though others will have to wade through jargon to get the meaning of the new masculinity."
A French feminist philosopher and historian radically declares that ``the time of androgyn has come,'' a time for men to reconcile masculine virility with femininity. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"This book's most obvious use is as an elaborate detour: Reading it lets writer's-block victims spend hours avoiding their problem while convincing themselves they're grappling with it."
An inflated expansion on an insightful comment from Tom Wolfe (``What's called writer's block is almost always ordinary fear''). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1995

"Not a basic primer so much as an emperor's-new-clothes account of academic philosophy by a man who found meaning in his own life through a commitment to one who shared his concern for all humanity."
A fascinating memoir with an ending that will change many people's opinion about the Peck's bad boy of philosophy. Read full book review >

THE BEAUTY TRIP by Ken Siman
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Underlying the tongue-in-cheek tone is the sense that Siman takes beauty all too seriously."
Lightweight though often entertaining reflections on an obsession with beauty. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

More-of-the-same sequel to last year's best-selling Motherless Daughters. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"It seems that the true meat of thought is here and not in the book they are responding to."
A searing response to the pseudo-science on the connection between race and intelligence put forth in the best-selling The Bell Curve by Charles Murray and Richard J. Herrnstein (not reviewed). Read full book review >
A PRAYER FOR CHILDREN by Ina Hughs
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"An affecting compilation of short prose pieces that intermittently move and entertain the reader."
An inspirational collection of short writings on subjects ranging from an 11-year-old's determination to rid herself of freckles to Helen Keller's perseverance in the presence of silence and blackness. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Nevertheless, an urgent, transparent style coupled with important subject matter result in a probing account of contemporary pain."
Extraordinarily well written popular psychology that dissects the complex power relations between modern lovers and within their societies. ``I doubt that anyone before our own era...expected marriage to make up for the pain of history,'' comments clinical psychologist Miller. Read full book review >
THE DEFEAT OF THE MIND by Alain Finkielkraut
NON-FICTION
Released: April 28, 1995

"Despite Finkielkraut's Gallic disregard for Anglo-American thought and his translator's clueless introduction, this passionate essay is a welcome moment of brightness in the increasingly murky debate."
If you never made it all the way through Allan Bloom's ponderous bestseller, The Closing of the American Mind (1987), then this short and provocative book, first published in France in the same year, is the perfect way to catch up with the larger issues in the culture wars. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 26, 1995

"Overall, a finely nuanced, beautifully written work, one that is rich in case studies and should help clinicians and patients alike to move therapy beyond the morally sterile culture of narcissism in which it's too often stuck."
A ringing, persuasive call for injecting moral considerations- -both personal and political— into the often self-oriented world of psychotherapy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >