Psychology Book Reviews (page 177)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Subjectively anecdotal, dilettantish wish-fulfillment."
New Age border-crossings that blur more than clarify where physics and the dreaming psyche meet. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >

MOTHERLESS DAUGHTERS by Hope Edelman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Many women will find this book painful, but it's reassuring to have the company of others when dealing with the complex emotions and lifelong effects of a mother's loss."
According to the testimony in this oddly comforting volume, women never get over missing dead or absent mothers, whether they were 2 or 22 or even 52 at the time of loss. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Stimulating, solid fare, likely to appeal to classicists, philosophers, and all who are concerned with perennial human issues."
A scholarly and beautifully written account of late Greek and Roman thought in which Nussbaum (Philosophy, Classics, and Comparative Literature/Brown Univ.) analyzes the use of philosophical argument as a technique for enabling people to grapple with fear of death, love and sexuality, anger and aggression. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Surviving Suicide'' would be a more apt, if less sensational, title for this casebook of eight families."
Despite his book's misleading title, Slaby's experiences in counseling grieving parents raise important questions about why so many youths' cries for help go unanswered. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Yapko gives no quarter to child abusers, but offers wise guidance and support to families whose lives have been decimated by false accusations."
Memory can be as malleable as clay, warns a clinical psychologist, and the road to recovering memories of child abuse is strewn with the shards of ``unwitting'' errors by so-called expert therapists. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"Although the trip chronicled was undoubtedly meaningful for the author and will appeal to New Age seekers, it will leave others cold. ($50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A vivid account of one woman's pilgrimage to the shrines and sacred sites of the New Age quickly degenerates into pop psychology and pseudo-profundities. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Critical yet fair scrutiny gives new life to an attractive, even Blakean figure who anticipated the Industrial Revolution's dark satanic mills."
Oxford philosopher/historian Berlin's strangest book, one that he set aside 25 years ago and had no wish to return to until editor Hardy intervened. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 27, 1994

"Don't take ours''), he is not so conscience- stricken as to refrain from peddling what he has learned."
An interesting but nonetheless weak follow-up to Arden's (Wisdomkeepers, not reviewed) work on American Indian spirituality and values. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 22, 1994

"Zohar and Marshall offer the general reader a better introduction to contemporary science than to social philosophy while stretching the limit of fashionable interdisciplinary discussion."
In the high-spirited Up my Mother's Flagpole (1974), Zohar characterized her early life as a process of individuation and alienation. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 15, 1994

"They just have more things to be stupid with."
In lighthearted discussions of Pharaohs who took it with them when they went to their tombs, gluttonous Dutch tulip speculators, Imelda Marcos' shoe fetish, bank-robber Willie Sutton, Ivan Boesky, Adnan Khashoggi, and others, Hirsh's brief history of lucre makes it clear that the very rich can be just as stupid as the rest of us. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 13, 1994

"Serious and thoughtful material presented with the fluidity of good fiction—sure to appeal to parents, teachers, and anyone interested in modern American culture."
Clinical psychologist Pipher turns her attention to female adolescence in contemporary America. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >