Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Of some initial appeal to those who enjoy taking relationship quizzes—but unlikely to hold the interest of any but the truly—well, committed. (First serial to New Woman)"
A heavy dose of pop advice and sympathetic handholding for those whose anxieties about commitment are messing up their love lives. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"As Honderich would have it, whether you read his book is not a matter of choice. Nonetheless, recommended for those with well- muscled brains."
Honderich (Philosophy/University College, London) ponders an age-old question—are we free agents or pawns of unknown forces?—and winds up embracing determinism. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 24, 1993

"Today, Erhard, escaping bad publicity, is in exile, his whereabouts apparently unknown to the press, including Pressman: a suitably shadowy stage in the life of a man who remains an enigma despite a dogged telling here of what, surely, is only half the story."
Mud-slinging exposÇ of the notorious pop guru who ``got it''- -and then tried to give it to the rest of the world. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 23, 1993

"A paean to perseverance that's rich in personal detail but short on new information or helpful strategies. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
Another heart-rending entry in the recent rush of memoirs from autistics and/or their mothers (Catherine Maurice's Let Me Hear Your Voice, p. 576, etc.). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 20, 1993

"But even so, it's a dense and weighty read. (Fifty b&w photos, eight pages color photos—not seen)"
This last volume of four (The Magician Within, p. 208, etc.) from Jungian psychoanalyst Moore and mythologist Gillette completes a vision of the mature man as a noble, emotionally generous, artistically expressive soul. Read full book review >

FRENCH LESSONS by Alice Kaplan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"The major impression Kaplan gives here is of how very interesting life can be to a French professor, especially at a time when French intellectuals dominate academic critical thought— making this enjoyable reading for Francophiles, perhaps, but not for many others."
``What do students need to know about their teachers?'' asks Kaplan (French Literature/Duke; Reproductions of Banality, 1986, etc.—not reviewed): ``How do I tell them who I am, why I read the way I do?'' Here, the author is thinking of the mysteries of her own teacher, Paul de Man—but her memoir, though artful, hasn't the intellectual force or interest of de Man's writing. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

An often interesting and provocative—though sometimes obvious and, finally, unconvincing—historical exploration of humanity's relationship to machines. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 1993

"What sourpuss would ask for rigorous honesty besides? (Eight pages b&w, eight pages color photographs- -not seen) (First serial rights to Cosmopolitan and New Woman)"
Up from poverty with ``beautiful, glamorous'' ex-Washington ``social hurricane'' Mosbacher, 45, who here releases her secrets for getting what she wants—including marrying a millionaire (in her case, three); buying and selling businesses at a profit (using her divorce settlements as seed money); and conquering the Washington social scene by raising pots of money for political campaigns. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

In dense, challenging, subtly argued philosophical essays, Bordo (Philosophy/LeMoyne College; The Flight to Objectivity, 1987- -not reviewed) offers a postmodern, poststructuralist feminist interpretation of the female body as a cultural construction in Western society, emphasizing eating disorders, reproductive issues, and the philosophical background. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Original and entertaining popular science. (Seventy photos, 19 drawings)"
Consistently insightful exploration of how we think about how we think. Read full book review >
ONLY WORDS by Catharine A. MacKinnon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Although MacKinnon's passionate conviction sometimes causes her ideas to elide and her logic to blur, the ideas are original and gripping, her references are wide-ranging, her legal logic is provocative—and her latest is must reading for anyone interested in either fairness or free speech."
Three passionate, intellectually fascinating essays, each arguing an aspect of the case that sexual words and pictures may by their nature be bannable, even though they may also be Constitutionally protected speech—by University of Michigan law professor and noted feminist legal scholar MacKinnon (Feminism Unmodified, 1987, etc). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Overall, then, a generous helping of hubris here—but not without redeeming insights on good and bad science, as well as examples of Cromer's own work in reforming middle-school science curricula. (Nineteen line drawings)"
Cromer (Physics/Northeastern) advances several agendas in this provocative, polemical work. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >