Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Ambitious and often penetrating, a laudable effort to explain the origins of, and restore balance to, current psychoanalytic debate. (For a complementary study of early male successors to Freud, see Phyllis Grosskurth's The Secret Ring, p. 1134.) (Photographs.)"
A notable, if occasionally impenetrable, attempt to trace the shift of psychoanalysis from a patriarchal to a matriarchal emphasis by analyzing the lives and works of the most prominent female successors to Freud. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

A witty, tightly written, and well-integrated look at our eternal struggles between order and chaos and the need to find a practical medium. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 1991

"Freudians."
Aided by previously undisclosed correspondence, Grosskurth (Havelock Ellis, 1980, etc.; Humanities and Psychoanalytic Thought/Univ. of Toronto) takes the story of the brilliant, wildly neurotic men who contrived to safeguard Freudian thought and turns it into an intriguing psychological saga-cum-tragicomedy of manners. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 16, 1991

"Sagan knows his ancient history and compellingly elucidates Athenian self-destructive paranoia, but his argument loses force with tentative speculations on the future, only tangential references to modern democracy, and overreliance on Freudian theory."
A fractured psychoanalytical history of democracy focusing mostly on the ancient Athenian city-state, from sociologist Sagan (Freud, Women, and Morality, 1988, etc. Sagan believes that Athenian democracy and our modern American republic share fundamental moral and psychological dilemmas that derive from the ``paranoid position'': a desire to control others and a fear of loss of self. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1991

"A one-sided but forceful caveat emptor for anyone seeking mental-health services."
A psychiatric reformer takes aim and blasts away with both barrels. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Withal, a fine, provocative and absorbing account of what makes humans human."
``The modern era, if it can be reduced to any single dimension, is especially characterized by its obsession with symbols and their management.'' So says Donald (Psychology/Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario), echoing the philosopher Ernst Cassirer a generation ago—with a difference. Read full book review >
MICHEL FOUCAULT by Didier Eribon
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Superbly written and carefully documented: Eribon has managed to provide a scholarly exegesis of Foucault that will also serve as a good introduction for the lay reader."
A meticulous and authoritative biography of the influential French philosopher and historian, by an editor at Le Nouvel Observateur who was closely acquainted with Foucault during his later years. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"A tasty and substantial intellectual treat."
Another helping of wit and wisdom from the ever-entertaining author of Tell Me a Story: A New Look at Real and Artificial Memory (1990), etc. Here, Schank, director of the Institute for the Learning Science at Northwestern Univ., uses tales of gourmet dinners he has known to evoke the workings of human memory, the underpinnings of the learning process, and the meaning of true intelligence. ``I love to eat and I love to think,'' claims the author, and since he also enjoys combining unpaid pleasures (eating well) with paid ones (writing books about thinking), his lively discussion of the learning process is filtered through tales of his recent sabbatical in Paris, during which he attempted to experience the best of French cuisine and refine his knowledge of good wines. Read full book review >
SILENCING THE SELF by Dana Crowley Jack
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Even so, look for this as a complement to often-cited books already on the shelves and expect readers to respond to the unadorned anecdotes, forceful prose style, and steady flow of insights into the dynamics of female depression."
In an enlightening but limited study, Jack (Psychology/Western Washington Univ.) focuses on the psychosocial factors behind female depression. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

Impassioned and eloquent, jazz historian Collier (Duke Ellington, 1987; Louis Armstrong: An American Genius, 1983, etc.) here turns a critical eye to the history of self-interest among Americans and its phenomenal growth in recent times. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"For others, his underlying beliefs and impatience with genuine contradiction will be the larger issue."
An accessible, ultimately skewed argument for moral-values education. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Elegant, illuminating, and of significant interest in this decade of need and limits."
Why do Americans collectively devote 20 billion hours of their time each year to helping others? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >