Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

TERESITA by John O’Brien
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1992

"Builds to a strong climax while undermining skepticism."
Fascinating Chicago murder procedural resolved by a voice from the afterlife, told here by the two Chicago reporters who first broke the story. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Notable for its window into the thoughts and feelings of an autistic child—and for its gratifyingly happy ending."
An unusual point/counterpoint journal by a mother and her son, chronicling the painful years the son suffered from autism and his remarkable recovery. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"Much of the impact of this smart, sweeping, intermittently clarifying commentary comes from well-captioned b&w photographs of influential landmarks of taste—from a Paris restaurant of 1900 to Converse sneakers, Coco Chanel, a William Morris print, and the Rothschilds' chateau."
A British design critic (Harley Earl and the Dream Machine, 1983) offers an opinionated tour of the modern and mercurial concept of taste, that ``merciless betrayer of social and cultural attitudes.'' ``Good'' and ``bad'' taste, Bayley argues, are not absolutes, and no longer the simple matter of rules they were in Joshua Reynolds's England. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1992

"An engaging, even charming, intellectual biography."
Of his life, anthropologist Hall (coauthor, Hidden Differences, 1987; The Dance of Life, 1982, etc.) says here, ``In the perspective of the years I can see that mine has been an unusual life—in fact, a remarkable one, endowed with luminosity.'' Hall, born in 1914, focuses in these appealing memoirs on his childhood through early midlife, tracing a personal evolution of ideas and ``self.'' He recalls many details of a past that ranges from his too-few years with his parents as the eldest of a brood of siblings, to his growing up among strangers at boarding schools in New Mexico, to time spent living with American Indians, serving in the US Army, and working in academia (Univ. of Denver and Bennington, where his ``best friend'' was Erich Fromm) and the federal government. Read full book review >
THE MISMEASURE OF WOMAN by Carol Tavris
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 1992

"The author's unusual ability to winnow out such deeply imbedded errors in thinking makes this an especially important, stimulating, and timely work, and an excellent complement to Susan Faludi's Backlash (1991)."
Social psychologist Tavris (Anger: The Misunderstood Emotion, 1983) unveils society's systemic and often unconscious definition of the male as the norm against which women must measure up or be found deficient—a provocative and thought-provoking look at how sexism persists today. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 21, 1992

"But difficult as her approach may be, it's sound and ultimately rewarding as well."
A sober study by a clinical psychologist of the destructive legacy that narcissistic parents bequeath to their children and the troubling characteristics those children share as adults. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 20, 1992

"Ambrosia for anyone—whether in agreement with Budiansky or not—who appreciates the beauty of an argument that combines careful scholarship with common sense."
A subtle look at the mysteries of evolution and a stinging response to animal-rights extremists, as Budiansky, a Maryland farmer and assistant managing editor of U.S. News and World Reports, debuts with this hardheaded examination of the whys and hows of human-animal interaction. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 18, 1992

According to the husband-and-wife team of scientist Hudson (Nightlife: The Interpretation of Dreams, 1986) and Jacot (a painter and psychological researcher), the psychological differences between men and women arise from a trauma suffered during infancy by men, in differentiating themselves from their mothers. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 17, 1992

"Provocative words—often captivating, but not often convincing."
The ethnobotanist co-author of Psilocybin: The Magic Mushroom Grower's Guide (not reviewed) puts forth the theory that magic mushrooms are the original ``tree of knowledge'' and that the general lack of psychedelic exploration is leading Western society toward eventual collapse or destruction—controversial statements, to say the least, though the argument's details often prove fascinating. Read full book review >
YOUR HEALING MIND by Reed C. Moskowitz
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 17, 1992

"An upbeat, down-to-earth book that functions well both as a self-help tool and as an introduction to mind-body therapy."
Mind-body therapy, ably demonstrated through case studies presented by psychiatrist Moskowitz, founder of NYU's Stress Disorders Medical Services Program. Read full book review >
LETTERS TO SARTRE by Simone de Beauvoir
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 1992

"Essential reading for anyone wanting to fathom this still towering, contradictory, revolutionary feminist, what she wrote, and what she made of her life."
Found in a cupboard and published last year in France, these "lost" love letters follow upon Deirdre Bair's magnificent Simone de Beauvoir (1990) with revelations about the author of The Second Sex and the exact nature of her extraordinary relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Occasionally repetitive and simplistic but nonetheless a warmhearted and genuinely inspiring introduction to compassion as a way of life."
The freewheeling author of the pop spiritual classic Be Here Now teams with fellow Hindu devotee Bush to guide inexperienced Americans on to the path of compassionate action—offering his own spiritual autobiography as testimony to the transforming power of love and social action. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >