Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 6, 1994

"A revealing, often disturbing account that somehow manages to be both compassionate and dispassionate."
An empathetic portrait of a group home for the mentally ill, by a New York Times reporter who spent two years observing day- to-day life there. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 1994

Wit and wisdom for intelligent life forms who have gotten past kindergarten. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 2, 1994

"Better when practicing than when preaching, Baur is insightful, compassionate, and wise."
A telling look into the pained hearts and confused minds of the mentally ill, by the author of The Dinosaur Man (1991). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1994

"The book has an air of tabloid TV, but the human drama here remains powerful."
Social worker Evans' gives a compelling account of a client's recovery of a childhood laced with physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Read full book review >
GENDER AND DISCOURSE by Deborah Tannen
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1994

"This may offer intrepid Tannen fans or academicians worthy bits of information and insight, but general readers are likely to find little reward in this dense tome."
In attempt to defend and expand upon her theories of miscommunication between men and women, sociolinguist Tannen provides the scholarly underpinnings of her 1990 bestseller, You Just Don't Understand. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1994

"Though this collection suffers from a dense academic style and does not significantly build on Chodorow's previous work, it nonetheless provides a provocative reminder that these are complex issues and that humans, with their capacity for individual variation, are complicated subjects."
Feminist theorist Chodorow conducts a complex, uneven, though occasionally intriguing investigation of some of the more controversial aspects of Freud's (and others', from Klein to Lacan) work on sex, gender, and psychoanalysis. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1994

"A holistic health lecture, loaded with personal anecdotes and research data, that often sounds as though it were being delivered from a pulpit."
An ambitious, sometimes ponderous, examination of the nature of health by the director of the corporate health program at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1994

"Though Walzer could show himself more aware of some issues, especially gender and race, this is a well-argued, if not always energetic, set of carefully wrought ideas on the state of public moral debate."
Walzer (The Company of Critics, 1988, etc.) thoughtfully answers objections to his many influential volumes of social criticism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1994

"All in all, a thoughtful, patiently assembled book that probes carefully and with moral toughness into precisely those painful truths."
As in God's Dust (1989), Buruma takes a psychological and cultural voyage into nationalism, guilt, and self-delusion — in this case, of two of WW II's defeated Axis powers. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 31, 1994

"Written for the general, but not the casual, reader, this work's extensive chapter notes on Kagan's methodology make it especially valuable to psychologists and psychiatrists."
A perceptive look at changing ideas about temperament, plus some strong opinions about the implications of current concepts. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 31, 1994

"Women Who Hurt Themselves should be helpful to mental health professionals who work with female trauma survivors, though some of its generalities should be taken with caution."
Women Who Hurt Themselves explores the suffering of women who reenact childhood trauma, particularly abuse or neglect, through self-destructive behavior. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 23, 1994

"A stimulating personal reflection on the complexities of communication between people, in whatever language or culture."
Perceptive anecdotes from Austria, India, and Mexico, from heroin-addict treatment centers, scuba dives, and linguistics conferences pepper this primer on the intricacies of cross-cultural discourse and ordinary conversation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >