Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 15, 1991

"Dossey's reflections will please true believers and fans of Bernie S. Siegel or Deepak Chopra, but, though well written, they lack the rigor likely necessary to win many converts."
Highly readable essays exploring the mind-body connection by physician Dossey, who brings to the holistic health movement the experience of a practicing internist and the soul of a poet. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

Kinder (Critical Studies/USC School of Cinema-Television) argues that the ``supersystem'' comprised of TV, video games, and movies aimed at children not only urges them to buy specific products but also indoctrinates them in the ways of post-modern consumer culture. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Yet another Cartesian stage manager, as Dennett might say?"
Writing with the same infectious enthusiasm that invests his much of his other work, Ornstein (coauthor, Healthy Pleasures, 1989; Multimind, 1986, etc.) replays familiar themes, adding some new twists. Read full book review >
ON CHARACTER by James Q. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"But however appealing to readers, it presents no clear guidelines for forming character or public policy."
Elegantly written essays on elevating standards of behavior in today's world. Read full book review >
KEEPING A RENDEZVOUS by John Berger
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A too-mixed bag, unbalanced mostly by political deadweight."
Berger (The Sense of Sight, 1985, etc.) as art critic is a maddening case. Read full book review >

CREATIVE CHARACTERS by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

Author of biographies of Hannah Arendt (1982) and Anna Freud (1988) as well as the novel Virgil (1983), Young-Bruehl hits the ground running in this demanding approach to understanding creativity. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Brilliant reportage, with all the details in place—a stunning debut."
The Pulitzer-winning journalist (The Wall Street Journal, Ms., The Miami Herald) explores the real status of American women in the 90's in this powerful and long-overdue myth-buster—an instant classic and a valuable companion to Paula Kamen's Feminist Fatale (reviewed below). Read full book review >
CONSCIOUSNESS EXPLAINED by Daniel C. Dennett
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Nevertheless, Dennett's analysis is so often brilliant, so witty, and so informed by contemporary culture as to make pleasurable the reading of what is truly a complex and demanding text."
Maybe not explained. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Ambitious and often penetrating, a laudable effort to explain the origins of, and restore balance to, current psychoanalytic debate. (For a complementary study of early male successors to Freud, see Phyllis Grosskurth's The Secret Ring, p. 1134.) (Photographs.)"
A notable, if occasionally impenetrable, attempt to trace the shift of psychoanalysis from a patriarchal to a matriarchal emphasis by analyzing the lives and works of the most prominent female successors to Freud. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

A witty, tightly written, and well-integrated look at our eternal struggles between order and chaos and the need to find a practical medium. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 1991

"Freudians."
Aided by previously undisclosed correspondence, Grosskurth (Havelock Ellis, 1980, etc.; Humanities and Psychoanalytic Thought/Univ. of Toronto) takes the story of the brilliant, wildly neurotic men who contrived to safeguard Freudian thought and turns it into an intriguing psychological saga-cum-tragicomedy of manners. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 16, 1991

"Sagan knows his ancient history and compellingly elucidates Athenian self-destructive paranoia, but his argument loses force with tentative speculations on the future, only tangential references to modern democracy, and overreliance on Freudian theory."
A fractured psychoanalytical history of democracy focusing mostly on the ancient Athenian city-state, from sociologist Sagan (Freud, Women, and Morality, 1988, etc. Sagan believes that Athenian democracy and our modern American republic share fundamental moral and psychological dilemmas that derive from the ``paranoid position'': a desire to control others and a fear of loss of self. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >