Psychology Book Reviews (page 178)

CAREER CRASH by Barry Glassner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Timely and readable career advice."
An affable, helpful look at the baby boomer generation's seemingly distinctive form of midlife emergency—losing a job and being unable to find another—by Glassner (Sociology/Univ. of Southern California; Bodies, 1988; Drugs in Adolescent Worlds, 1987). Read full book review >
ON FAMILIAR TERMS by Donald Keene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Keene complains of lukewarm or worse reviews of his monumental survey volume World Without Walls (1976)—but the Kirkus reviewer gave it the same high praise this memoir deserves as well."
Charming memoir by prolific specialist in Japanese literature Keene (Travelers of a Hundred Ages, 1989, etc.), who seems to have found a culture that mirrored his character traits of introversion and flight into deep study. Read full book review >

LISTENING by Hannah Merker
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Of interest both to hearing and non-hearing readers."
``I am an archeologist digging for sound, for its origins, its wondrous manifestations.'' Deafened in a skiing accident two decades ago, Merker, in lyrical, intent appreciations, plumbs the relationships between self and sound, and the webs of communication within the world—seeking ``new ways of listening for the hearing and the hearing impaired.'' To the author, deaf and despairing, a friend offered an ``experiment'' of sharing in words a world of sound, until an awareness grew of events and things with sound: a struck match; the thunder that follows lightening. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A poignant sequel to Williams's ongoing adventure, her experiences here more closely shadowing the emotional struggles of non-autistic adults."
A compelling continuation of Williams's determined struggle to break free from autism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

A provocative dual biography that sets out to recast Simone de Beauvoir as the ``true philosopher'' in her legendary relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre; by the Fullbrooks (she: Literary Studies/Univ. of the West of England; he: a freelance writer). Read full book review >

THE LIVES OF MICHEL FOUCAULT by David Macey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"A cautious and respectful study—avoiding luridness and gossip while preserving its subject's dignity—that Foucault himself might have authorized."
Elusive and private, ``the lives'' of Michel Foucault (1926- 84) include the many public roles that he assumed—as philosopher, academic, historian, political activist, and homosexual—roles that both reflected and helped shape the character of postwar France. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1994

In a challenging, timely, and persuasive argument, Jackendoff (Brandeis; the scholarly Semantics and Cognition, 1983—not reviewed) proposes that language and, by extension, music and visual experience in part culturally engendered—but that, fundamentally, they're expressions of innate, perhaps even genetic, properties of the brain. Read full book review >
ON BEING HUMAN by Erich Fromm
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 18, 1994

"Fromm's large, keen mind and attractive, likable voice strives for heart as he asks himself the hardest questions of his day."
Posthumous gathering of thoughts by the late socialist/humanist of The Art of Loving, The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness, etc. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A soothing, clearly presented message of self-acceptance that may succeed in adding four new terms to the vocabulary of psychobabble. (First serial to Redbook)"
Slickly packaged pop psych from Kinder, who's previously tackled myths about self-improvement (Going Nowhere Fast, 1990) and marriage (Husbands and Wives, 1989). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

A partially successful exploration of the stereotypical images and overriding themes through which many women live their lives. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Readable, solidly rooted in research, and offering—for the most part—a hopeful message. (Tables throughout rate treatments for various disorders according to effectiveness and expense) (First printing of 75,000)"
Provocative overview by Seligman (Psychology/U. of Penn.; Learned Optimism, 1991) of human psychological and behavioral characteristics: Which ones are subject to change? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >