Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 29, 1992

"Shurkin successfully humanizes the Terman study at the same time that he lifts the veil of romance from its subjects."
A revelatory report on the late Lewis Terman's extraordinary study of nearly 1,500 intellectually ``gifted'' children, a study that began in 1921 and continues today. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 29, 1992

"Even with the celebrity gloss, essentially uninspired and uninspiring."
Interviews with numerous individuals, many of them celebrities, on how they have coped with adversity. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 19, 1992

"Not another quick-fix book, but a sober look at what's known about the nature of human happiness. (Twenty-five illustrations- -not seen.)"
Myers, a research-oriented social psychologist whose views, he acknowledges, are colored by his Christian values, offers an ``interim report on a fledgling science''— the study of happiness. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 15, 1992

Here, rescued from out-of-print limbo in an apparent attempt to capitalize on the success of Keen's bestselling A Fire in the Belly, comes a 1980 Keen work, slightly revised and given a new introduction—and a new name, so much more 90's-style than the original: What to Do When You're Bored and Blue. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 15, 1992

"The women's narratives speak eloquently for themselves."
A notable contribution to the understanding of women's development, as leading Jungian analyst Woodman comments on and provides a theoretical framework for personal accounts by three of her clients. Read full book review >

THE SILENT PASSAGE by Gail Sheehy
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 12, 1992

"Sheehy's book will be a bible for them—and hopefully for the doctors who treat them."
A compelling discussion about menopause, packed with facts and anecdotes that are right on target for the baby-boom women about to encounter change of life. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 11, 1992

An impressively researched, authoritative, and absolutely mind-boggling survey of ``the transformative capacities of human nature.'' As to be expected from a co-founder of California's Esalen Institute, the emphasis here is very much on mind-body phenomena, with the focus on individuals who apparently have extended the usual reach of human possibility—saints, mystics, psychics, artists, geniuses, etc. Drawing on an astonishing array of eyewitness accounts, scientific studies, biographies, letters, monographs, etc., Murphy rigorously organizes his vast material into three categories: ``Possibilities for Extraordinary Life''; ``Transformative Practices''; and ``Evidence for Human Transformative Capacity.'' In the last category, for example, he discusses and documents placebo effects, spiritual healing, hypnosis, ``somatic'' disciplines such as the Alexander Technique and the Feldenkrais Method, yogic powers, the charismas of saints, etc. All this fascinating if sometimes sensational information does serve a purpose, of course—to illuminate the author's ``central observations and proposals,'' e.g., that ``the evidence for extraordinary human attributes strongly supports some sort of penentheism....the doctrine that Divinity is both immanent and transcendent to the universe.'' Whatever one thinks of Murphy's conclusions, even a casual dipping into his text, which will no doubt become a primary source for future mind-body investigation, will reveal a world of inspiring wonders. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 8, 1992

"Follow your bliss'' prescriptions seem a sure tonic for the times."
How do adults grow? Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 6, 1992

"An original and highly stimulating argument in favor of bringing science and scientists back down to earth."
Former physics professor Schwartz offers a captivating history of the progressive alienation between Western culture and its scientists—an unnatural split that, he says, can be blamed for, among other things, modern technological disasters, cultural malaise, and the physics-propelled cold war. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1992

"A grim and gripping report."
Life within a ``hell and heaven, dungeon and sanctuary'' for the mentally ill, here given the fictitious name of Bedloe State Hospital. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1992

"Extraordinary in so many ways, Sartre's 1924-39 letters illuminate his evolving thought and his groundbreaking relationship with Beauvoir—perhaps at its finest in their exchange of written words."
Only three months after Simone de Beauvoir's Letters to Sartre appeared in English, we now have a fine translation of the other side of this rightfully legendary correspondence. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 20, 1992

"We can not yet, and perhaps never will, eliminate philosophy or psychology from the discussion."
``Strenuous'' is how Nobelist (Physiology or Medicine, 1972) Edelman describes the difficulties readers will encounter as they ply their way through yet another texty analysis of what it means to be a mind. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >