Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

DWELLINGS by Linda Hogan
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"Some fine insights obscured by the large chip on the author's shoulder."
Seventeen often accusatory essays on man's relationship with nature by Native American poet and novelist Hogan (Mean Spirit, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

"Fascinating stories, but told with a reductionist analysis."
Fifteen all-too-brief case studies that show how abusive or emotionally neglectful father figures can permanently scar their children's lives. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Rogers's vague descriptions of recovering memories in therapy sheds no light on that controversial issue, but she humanizes therapists and provides an illuminating inside view of their training and the two-sided nature of their work."
A beautifully written first-person account of a novice therapist's trial by fire. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Fans of Oliver Sacks will find much to savor here."
The mysteries of human memory are deftly probed by Hilts, New York Times Washington correspondent on science and health policy (Scientific Temperaments, 1982, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Well argued and astute, this critical work makes an exciting contribution to contemporary scientific and cultural debate."
In a brilliantly controversial polemic, Johnson (Law/Univ. of Calif., Berkeley) fires an intellectual broadside against what he sees as the marginalization of theism in public life and explores its implications for society and religion. Read full book review >

THE BEAST by Tracy Thompson
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The author is a better journalist than she is a memoirist; still, an instructive addition to the growing literature on depression. (First serial to the Washington Post Magazine and Cosmopolitan; Book-of-the-Month Club selection; author tour)"
Another first-hand account of the depression era (psychological, not financial) of the '90s. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 17, 1995

"A minatory vision that will impress the credulous and lovers of superficial, eclectic mysticism."
Emulating Carlos Castaneda, anthropologist Wesselman recounts his spirit journeys 5,000 years into the future, when an ecologically devastated America has been partly colonized by Hawaiians and Eskimos. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 15, 1995

``We have come a long way from regarding passionate love as...simply a romantic agony of fatal perversions and deadly sex,'' writes psychoanalyst Gediman. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 10, 1995

"A compelling blend of memoir and literary analysis; too bad her understanding of feminism is a little out of date."
Despite the insipid title, an evocative exploration of the author's struggle to see her own physical beauty, skillfully blended with rigorous and sensitive analyses of literary heroines who have tried to do the same. Read full book review >
DELUSIONS OF EVERYDAY LIFE by Leonard Shengold
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Informative and thought-provoking, but of interest largely to clinicians."
A demanding if not always well-organized study of why we persist in lying to ourselves. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Nonetheless, the author's skillful interviewing, synthesis, and organization of materialand her subjects' apparent clinical depth and thoughtfulnessmake for a rewarding work."
Based on interviews with 12 articulate and seemingly skillful clinicians, a close study of the craft (first) and science (second) of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Unfortunately, like Foucault's work itself, probably too arcane for a general readership."
A self-described ``worshipper'' of Foucault takes on critics of the philosopher in two interrelated essays dealing with Foucault's sexual politics and his biographers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >