Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 26, 1995

"Overall, a finely nuanced, beautifully written work, one that is rich in case studies and should help clinicians and patients alike to move therapy beyond the morally sterile culture of narcissism in which it's too often stuck."
A ringing, persuasive call for injecting moral considerations- -both personal and political— into the often self-oriented world of psychotherapy. Read full book review >
KINDS OF POWER by James Hillman
NON-FICTION
Released: April 20, 1995

"In his gnomic one-liners, Hillman comes across as part latter- day Emerson and part Sensitive New Age Guy, but the reader is likely to view the whole as flapdoodle."
Jungian analyst Hillman (coauthor, Freud's Own Cookbook, 1985, etc.) rambles on about a new, and hopefully healthier, paradigm of power for the business world. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1995

"A theory this debatable requires stronger proof than this book offers."
Purportedly revealing compositions of an autistic young man who has been mute since age two; skeptics will view them otherwise. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1995

"No facile synthesis of the two systems here, but rather a thoughtful account that allows their paths to converge and diverge without losing sight of the distinctive contributions of each to deeper self-understanding."
An intriguing, if only partly successful, effort to apply Buddhist insights, particularly from meditation, to patient- therapist dynamics. Read full book review >
NO VOICE IS EVER WHOLLY LOST by Louise J. Kaplan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Occasionally bogged down in overanalysis, but generally a probing, sensitive, and finely crafted work that deserves a wide readership among clinicians and laypeople."
A wide-ranging, profound study of how the primal human dialogue between parent and child continues after the death of one partner through various adaptive strategies by the survivor. Read full book review >

DRINKING THE RAIN by Alix Kates Shulman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"Inconsequentiality seems to be the point here—as readers marooning themselves at their own summer havens will perhaps best understand."
Slight but not unrewarding, this memoir of a feminist's midlife retreat toward nature and spirituality escapes solipsism by virtue of its terse writing and agreeable epiphanies. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"While Yeti enthusiasts may be disappointed, Taylor-Ide has been where few have tread and emerges with a fascinating portrait. (b&w photos)"
Dispatches from the Yeti watch, with entertaining rambles into the deep, near-mythic valleys of Nepal. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"At worst, sketchy and poorly analyzed."
A dull book seeking to prove that the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, and Santa Claus are myths beneficial to children's development. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Practical, though unoriginal, insights for seekers. ($150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
More eclectic advice on how to release the boundless resources that lie within, from the prolific Dyer. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Halprin's stories are colorful, exciting additions to feminist discourse on appearance; too bad she burdens them with therapy clichÇs and pseudohistoricism."
The usual pitfalls of goddess revisionism afflict these murky musings about beauty, ugliness, myth, spirituality, and women. Read full book review >
AT HOME IN THE WORLD by Michael Jackson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Jackson's ethnography stands on its own as an exploration of the main theme, but his poetry and his philosophizing are often arbitrary and a bit invasive."
A disconcerting blend of ethnography, poetry, and philosophy that attempts to answer the question of what it means to be at home in the world. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Provocative reading, whatever your point of view."
American pragmatism and delight in clashing values characterize this well-informed survey of contemporary moral issues. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >