Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

FRENCH LESSONS by Alice Kaplan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"The major impression Kaplan gives here is of how very interesting life can be to a French professor, especially at a time when French intellectuals dominate academic critical thought— making this enjoyable reading for Francophiles, perhaps, but not for many others."
``What do students need to know about their teachers?'' asks Kaplan (French Literature/Duke; Reproductions of Banality, 1986, etc.—not reviewed): ``How do I tell them who I am, why I read the way I do?'' Here, the author is thinking of the mysteries of her own teacher, Paul de Man—but her memoir, though artful, hasn't the intellectual force or interest of de Man's writing. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

An often interesting and provocative—though sometimes obvious and, finally, unconvincing—historical exploration of humanity's relationship to machines. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 1993

"What sourpuss would ask for rigorous honesty besides? (Eight pages b&w, eight pages color photographs- -not seen) (First serial rights to Cosmopolitan and New Woman)"
Up from poverty with ``beautiful, glamorous'' ex-Washington ``social hurricane'' Mosbacher, 45, who here releases her secrets for getting what she wants—including marrying a millionaire (in her case, three); buying and selling businesses at a profit (using her divorce settlements as seed money); and conquering the Washington social scene by raising pots of money for political campaigns. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

In dense, challenging, subtly argued philosophical essays, Bordo (Philosophy/LeMoyne College; The Flight to Objectivity, 1987- -not reviewed) offers a postmodern, poststructuralist feminist interpretation of the female body as a cultural construction in Western society, emphasizing eating disorders, reproductive issues, and the philosophical background. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Original and entertaining popular science. (Seventy photos, 19 drawings)"
Consistently insightful exploration of how we think about how we think. Read full book review >

ONLY WORDS by Catharine A. MacKinnon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Although MacKinnon's passionate conviction sometimes causes her ideas to elide and her logic to blur, the ideas are original and gripping, her references are wide-ranging, her legal logic is provocative—and her latest is must reading for anyone interested in either fairness or free speech."
Three passionate, intellectually fascinating essays, each arguing an aspect of the case that sexual words and pictures may by their nature be bannable, even though they may also be Constitutionally protected speech—by University of Michigan law professor and noted feminist legal scholar MacKinnon (Feminism Unmodified, 1987, etc). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Overall, then, a generous helping of hubris here—but not without redeeming insights on good and bad science, as well as examples of Cromer's own work in reforming middle-school science curricula. (Nineteen line drawings)"
Cromer (Physics/Northeastern) advances several agendas in this provocative, polemical work. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 30, 1993

"More attentive to Jung's side of the equation, perhaps, but still a neat, substantial piece of psychoanalytic puzzle-solving, provocative and eminently readable."
A solid new interpretation of the short-lived but oft-analyzed collaboration between Freud and Jung, in which the mysterious Sabina Spielrein figures prominently. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 30, 1993

"100 uses of a safety pin'' school of thought."
It takes chutzpah to come up with a scheme for analyzing creativity—especially in subjects already exhaustively examined. Read full book review >
WARRIORS IN EDEN by Mariano Gagnon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"A moderately gripping story of a modern-day hero, despite the warts. (Photos)"
A Franciscan missionary battles drug-runners and Shining Path terrorists on behalf of Peruvian Indians: a story competently told with the help of the Hoffers, specialists in coauthoring tales of Third World trauma (Midnight Express, Not Without My Daughter). Read full book review >
B.F. SKINNER by Daniel W. Bjork
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"More engaging when discussing ideas than when probing Skinner's roots or private life, and hardly the definitive biography; but, even so, Bjork gives a clear view of an American original whom posterity could judge more kindly than did his contemporaries. (Photos)"
A fair-minded, insightful portrayal of the life and ideas of one of America's most controversial thinkers, by Bjork (History/St. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 20, 1993

"The merits of what might have been a useful biography are squandered here in stylistic excess and single-minded scholarship."
California psychoanalyst Douglas turns a fascinated but short- sighted eye to the life of Christiana Morgan, a woman of influence in the formative years of American psychoanalysis. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >