Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

NON-FICTION
Released: March 26, 1996

"Of special interest to sufferers, but also valuable to their families and to health professionals."
Words of comfort from a recovered hypochondriac whose own fear-filled years of suffering, eventual mental breakdown, and successful therapy demonstrate that this much-maligned ailment can be treated. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 21, 1996

"Elkins is to be commended for shedding as much light as he does (and for elegantly abstaining from the temptations of academic jargon) in a ceaselessly thought-provoking book. (36 illustrations)"
Unfocused but frequently illuminating meditations on how we see and how we don't. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1996

"Unpretentious, open, humorous, and with a flair for language, de Waal nimbly displays that rare and wonderful scientific mind: as much at home with contradiction, clutter, and illogic as with systematic data."
Can we recognize a sense of morality in creatures other than ourselves? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 1996

Straight from the heart and the boob tube, Montel's memoir offers simplistic, ``as seen on TV'' solutions to complex problems. Read full book review >
INTEGRITY by Stephen L. Carter
NON-FICTION
Released: March 13, 1996

"Carter has a supple mind and readable style, but these are overwhelmed by the overinflated and underrealized material. ($50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
In the footsteps of fellow virtuecrats such as William Bennett and Michael Lewis, another ringing defense of the obvious. Read full book review >

BRUTAL BOSSES by Harvey A. Hornstein
NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 1996

"An us-against-them exercise in pop anti-authoritarian sociology that, for all its lack of analytic depth and other deficiencies, could strike responsive chords among latter-day malcontents."
An awesomely aggrieved tract on the perceived problem of gratuitously swinish superiors, which reveals far more about its author (A Knight in Shining Armor, 1991, etc.) than about the amorphous wrongs he purports to address. Read full book review >
AM I THIN ENOUGH YET? by Sharlene Hesse-Biber
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Too academic to have wide appeal, but likely to stimulate lively discussion in classes devoted to women's studies."
A tendentious argument by a feminist sociologist that eating disorders are the product of patriarchal social and economic interests that regard women primarily as wives, mothers, and decorative objects. Read full book review >
TERRORS AND EXPERTS by Adam Phillips
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"As such, it demands to be discussed and decoded as much as read."
Seven wide-ranging essays on intrapsychic processes and the analytic relationship that are five parts scintillation, four parts intellectual irritation, and one part obscurity. Read full book review >
PRIVATE MYTHS by Anthony Stevens
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Erudite and engaging."
Wide-ranging essay on the importance of dreams by a Jungian analyst who maintains that they are the ``only natural oases of spirituality left to us.'' Stevens (Archetypes: A Natural History of the Self, 1982, etc.) sees dreams as having the function of myths and religion, that is, the integration of old wisdom with new knowledge. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"His enthusiasm for their work is evident everywhere throughout this lively book."
An illuminating study of New York radical culture from the 1930s to the 1960s. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Gerzon makes astute use of printed sources to back up his arguments, but his analysis remains maddeningly superficial and wholly unconvincing."
A former flower child's disjointed exhortation for everyone to get along and have a little faith in democracy. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO MY COUNTRY by Lauren Slater
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"In both, eloquent young psychologists reveal their private miseries and their concerns about the therapeutic process. (First serial to Harper's; author tour)"
A young psychologist's deeply moving stories about her patients—stories that turn out to be astonishingly revealing about the author's psyche. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >