Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

A provocative book by a senior editor of the New Republic, author of Three Scientists and Their Gods (1988), examining the vibrant new science of evolutionary psychology. Read full book review >
THE ART OF LISTENING by Erich Fromm
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Fromm is concerned here, it seems, not with building a better world but with building a better shrink."
While the coming of August is enough to send most psychoanalysts fleeing the needs of their patients for the beach, it appears that not even death can keep the wizened Fromm (On Being Human, 1993, etc.) from dispensing wisdom. Read full book review >

THE PRIMARY COLORS by Alexander Theroux
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1994

"But from the still-crucial perspective of readability, Theroux's primary colors seem, sadly, a muddle. (Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
What a luminous idea, to devote a trio of poetic essays to the three primary colors. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 1994

"The patient notes are a trifle gimmicky, and the accounts of group meetings become tiresome, but the writing sparkles when the subject is scientific research."
Ostensibly a slice of life inside McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass., during a two-week period in the spring of 1993, but actually a report on the status of psychiatric treatment today. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 15, 1994

"Caricaturing his opponents, he does little but rehash the Enlightenment view of the self without bringing much new to the table."
A sometimes intriguing, if uninspired, examination of the history of psychology and the workings of the human mind. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1994

"Some new wine, but mostly old brew in old bottles."
Neuropsychiatrist Restak (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) tackles age-old questions about the nature of free will, thought, emotion, and creativity in the process of explicating the theory of the modular brain. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A worthwhile effort, covering important ground competently."
Hoffman (The Right to Be Human, 1988, etc.) throws steady, if hardly sparkling, light on a career overshadowed by Freud's. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Too theoretical to be a homey reader's companion, not rigorous enough to be a serious scholarly examination."
An earnest and intimate, though single-minded and somewhat disappointing, tour through women's romance fiction, from Jane Austen to contemporary lesbian novels. Read full book review >
OUR DREAMING MIND by Robert L. Van de Castle
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"For those eager to explore the land of dreams this is an amiable guide, with lots of leads on how to get more deeply involved; skeptics, however, will not be persuaded. (Book-of-the- Month alternate selection/Quality Paperback main selection)"
Despite its two-column, textbookish format, an unpedantic survey by a self-described ``dreamworker'' of how dreams have been regarded throughout history, with emphasis on the author's own experiences during 30 years of investigation into ``clear- seeing at night.'' The former director of the Sleep and Dream Laboratory at the University of Virginia Medical School, Van de Castle (who will be featured in a Discovery Channel series, ``Dreams,'' in August) argues ardently and articulately that dreams are a proper subject of scientific research. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A practical, solidly researched and documented parents'-eye view of adolescence."
A sensible analysis of the turmoil that adolescence triggers within parents. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 12, 1994

"An agreeable repast, one that will ethically inform even those ill-mannered readers who prefer to help themselves buffet-style rather than wait for the various courses of the argument to be served."
Doctor-turned-teacher Kass (Committee on Social Thought/Univ. of Chicago) serves up a stimulating treatise on the anthropology and ethics of eating. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 11, 1994

"Worthwhile if only for Phebe Davis's pungent observations, but also for framing historic patterns of abuse of the mentally ill."
A hundred years of first-person reports from women committed to mental institutions that seem no less distressing in the 20th century than in the 19th. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >