Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1991

"A one-sided but forceful caveat emptor for anyone seeking mental-health services."
A psychiatric reformer takes aim and blasts away with both barrels. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Withal, a fine, provocative and absorbing account of what makes humans human."
``The modern era, if it can be reduced to any single dimension, is especially characterized by its obsession with symbols and their management.'' So says Donald (Psychology/Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario), echoing the philosopher Ernst Cassirer a generation ago—with a difference. Read full book review >

MICHEL FOUCAULT by Didier Eribon
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Superbly written and carefully documented: Eribon has managed to provide a scholarly exegesis of Foucault that will also serve as a good introduction for the lay reader."
A meticulous and authoritative biography of the influential French philosopher and historian, by an editor at Le Nouvel Observateur who was closely acquainted with Foucault during his later years. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"A tasty and substantial intellectual treat."
Another helping of wit and wisdom from the ever-entertaining author of Tell Me a Story: A New Look at Real and Artificial Memory (1990), etc. Here, Schank, director of the Institute for the Learning Science at Northwestern Univ., uses tales of gourmet dinners he has known to evoke the workings of human memory, the underpinnings of the learning process, and the meaning of true intelligence. ``I love to eat and I love to think,'' claims the author, and since he also enjoys combining unpaid pleasures (eating well) with paid ones (writing books about thinking), his lively discussion of the learning process is filtered through tales of his recent sabbatical in Paris, during which he attempted to experience the best of French cuisine and refine his knowledge of good wines. Read full book review >
SILENCING THE SELF by Dana Crowley Jack
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Even so, look for this as a complement to often-cited books already on the shelves and expect readers to respond to the unadorned anecdotes, forceful prose style, and steady flow of insights into the dynamics of female depression."
In an enlightening but limited study, Jack (Psychology/Western Washington Univ.) focuses on the psychosocial factors behind female depression. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

Impassioned and eloquent, jazz historian Collier (Duke Ellington, 1987; Louis Armstrong: An American Genius, 1983, etc.) here turns a critical eye to the history of self-interest among Americans and its phenomenal growth in recent times. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"For others, his underlying beliefs and impatience with genuine contradiction will be the larger issue."
An accessible, ultimately skewed argument for moral-values education. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Elegant, illuminating, and of significant interest in this decade of need and limits."
Why do Americans collectively devote 20 billion hours of their time each year to helping others? Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Hopscotch organization and choppy prose don't help Vankin's brief, but, thorough and enthusiastic, it still offers enjoyably wild, sometimes challenging, fare for anyone who wonders who really rules the roost."
A paranoid's full plate as Vankin, news editor of Metro, a California "alternative weekly newspaper,'' tromps through every conspiracy theory you've ever heard of—and then some. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 18, 1991

"Cautious, penetrating, well- focused, it raises many interesting and original questions."
Delivered as a series of lectures at Columbia, Yale, Smith, and in Paris, this eloquent, scholarly, and perceptive study explores the significance of Moses and Monotheism, Freud's last major work, written in 1934 when the impending Holocaust led him to reflect on his own Jewish identity and on psychoanalysis as a ``Jewish science.'' Yerushalmi (Professor and Director, Center for Israel and Jewish Studies/Columbia) treats Moses and Monotheism as a historical as well as a psychological document, tracing its origins to a 1822 text by Ernst Sellin, the first to claim that Moses was an Egyptian who gave monotheism to the Jews, rescued them, and in turn was slain by them in retaliation against the strict regulations he imposed on them. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 1991

"Chopra's combination of erudition, wit, and warmth of heart."
Here, Chopra (Perfect Healing, 1990; Return of the Rishi, 1988) laments that "our culture provides us with so little opportunity to confront the basic meaning of life that sickness and death have filled the void by becoming conversion experiences." Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 13, 1991

"Well written in nontechnical language; unique and persuasive."
A perceptive study of modern culture's overriding fascination with the self and identity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >