Psychology Book Reviews (page 179)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A soothing, clearly presented message of self-acceptance that may succeed in adding four new terms to the vocabulary of psychobabble. (First serial to Redbook)"
Slickly packaged pop psych from Kinder, who's previously tackled myths about self-improvement (Going Nowhere Fast, 1990) and marriage (Husbands and Wives, 1989). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

A partially successful exploration of the stereotypical images and overriding themes through which many women live their lives. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Readable, solidly rooted in research, and offering—for the most part—a hopeful message. (Tables throughout rate treatments for various disorders according to effectiveness and expense) (First printing of 75,000)"
Provocative overview by Seligman (Psychology/U. of Penn.; Learned Optimism, 1991) of human psychological and behavioral characteristics: Which ones are subject to change? Read full book review >
MOTHER TONGUE by Joel Davis
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"A first-rate overview of language from A to Z, and then some."
Comprehensive report by veteran science writer Davis (Mapping the Code, 1990, etc.) on the glories and mysteries of language. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Translating emotions over time and across cultures is Miller's major methodological challenge—and he meets it with ranging and learned references, a wry and unpretentious style, and a genuine respect for the power of those ancient, forgotten sources on which modern social exchange depends."
From Vikings to valentines, crimes to dinner invitations, Miller (Law/University of Michigan) here explores the mercurial history of the emotions, attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with honor—its defense, loss, survival, and display- -drawing on evidence from the Greek epics and Icelandic sagas to contemporary horror movies. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Unsensational, frank, and—despite its outlandish subject- -having the ring of truth. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen) (First serial to the National Enquirer)"
Refreshingly low-key memoir by a crime-busting psychic. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Devotees of medical lore will find this a treasure trove."
Lively, anecdote-filled account of how culture interacts with biology to produce different sets of psychosomatic symptoms in different groups of people. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Rich character studies, plus lucid explanations of psychological concepts."
More well-told, insightful narratives from the files of psychotherapist Weinberg (Nearer to the Heart's Desire, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 1993

"A saga of psychotherapy taken to its bloody limit: fascinating and disturbing in spite of the dull, objective style adopted by each narrator."
A harrowing yet oddly diffident reconstruction of a young woman's desperate search for a self through self-mutilation, as described separately by her analyst and herself at the end of 16 years of treatment. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"A radical proposal, as polemical as it is utopian, but useful in isolating a severe, festering problem in American society, one that will require strong medicine to heal."
In no uncertain terms, social-welfare specialists Specht (UC- Berkeley) and Courtney (Univ. of Wisconsin) decry the trend toward private practice in their field over the last 50 years, demanding instead a return to community-based social programs. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 1993

"Without Beauvoir's responses, the letters reveal the trivial and commonplace preoccupations of even the most heroic of intellects in the most trying of times."
A sequel to Witness to My Life (1992), which collected Sartre's letters to Simone de Beauvoir from 1926 to 1939. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >