Psychology Book Reviews (page 2)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"Attention-grabbing research that amply shows the many detriments of social media, particularly for young adults."
The latest exploration of why social media may not be so great after all. Read full book review >
WHAT LOVE IS by Carrie Jenkins
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Those who don't already have a good idea what love is before beginning the volume won't have gained one by its conclusion."
In her first book, Jenkins (Philosophy/Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver) examines romantic love as a phenomenon at the intersection of biology and social convention. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Thirty days on LSD therapy makes for a fascinating trip, indeed, and a learning opportunity for readers interested in the past and present therapeutic uses for psychedelic drugs."
How self-administering tiny doses of LSD abated the disintegration of the author's mental health and family life. Read full book review >
THE ART OF BEING FREE by James Poulos
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Provocative assertions buried in a confusing presentation."
A journalist expands on Alexis de Tocqueville's cultural critiques of American life. Read full book review >
IS IT ALL IN YOUR HEAD? by Suzanne O'Sullivan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"An intriguing look at how mental processes affect and alter our views—and feelings—of health and illness."
Feeling out of sorts? Take two imaginary aspirin and call us in the morning. Read full book review >

The Attachment Bond by Virginia M. Shiller
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 2017

"A useful, thorough survey of a cornerstone theory, if somewhat dry at times."
A clinical psychologist explains the five-decade history of attachment theory and its relation to personal development. Read full book review >
THE POWER OF MEANING by Emily Esfahani Smith
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A good choice for self-help seekers but not likely for others."
Common-sense suggestions on how to feel that life is worth living. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Accessible, highly effective methods for raising well-behaved children."
Advice for parents on handling toddlers to pre-tweens. Read full book review >
RADICALIZATION by Farhad Khosrokhavar
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A timely, systematic breakdown of thee reasons for radicalization."
A French scholar delineates the attractions of violent extremism, specifically jihadi Islam. Read full book review >
THE STRESS TEST by Ian Robertson
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"An intriguing overview of important developments in brain research, specifically as it relates to finding 'the right mental balance we need for each challenge that faces us.'"
A veteran neuroscientist and clinical psychologist explores the changes that occur in our brains depending upon how we deal with challenging situations. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A worthy primer on the science of comprehending language at the visible, symbolic level of print, a place that requires plenty of brain power and years of practice to navigate."
Johnny can't read—and too often his teachers can only guess why. Read full book review >
REST by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A useful holiday gift at a time when New Year's resolutions will be on the agenda."
Why being a workaholic is not the key to greater productivity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >