Psychology Book Reviews (page 2)

THE MAN IN THE MONSTER by Martha Elliott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A disturbing and multifaceted exposé of both a ruthless killer and the sympathetic, merciful journalist at odds with his capital fate."
The story of a journalist's decadelong friendship with a convicted serial rapist and murderer. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A provocative examination of deep questions—not easy reading but worth sticking with, if only for the fascinating case studies."
Psychology and philosophy intersect in a study of mental states that raises the question of what we refer to when we say "myself." Read full book review >

What the Enemy Thinks by Gail Picco
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 30, 2015

"Overdrawn yet readable portrait of collective advocacy and friendship at work, spearheaded by a valiant, relatable protagonist."
Former women's shelter counselor Picco, in her debut, traces the intertwining business and personal lives of an altruistic media consultancy executive. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 14, 2015

"Never fails to bring gratuitous academic heft to the instinctive, ancient principles of simple bartering."
Business school professors attempt to teach the art of negotiation with a mix of psychology and basic economic logic. Read full book review >
ANXIOUS by Joseph LeDoux
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 14, 2015

"Not turgid enough for academia or lucid enough to be quality popular science, the book is a dense, detailed, often stimulating review of how the brain processes external threats."
This is no self-help book but rather a rigorous scientific analysis of brain function, heavy on research and theory. Read full book review >

LET'S BE LESS STUPID by Patricia Marx
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 14, 2015

"A sly, irreverent take on the latest obsessions regarding self-improvement."
New Yorker staff writer Marx (Starting from Happy: A Novel, 2011, etc.), the first woman elected to the Harvard Lampoon, brings her wit and quirky curiosity to the timely topic of mental acuity.Read full book review >
THE BIOLOGY OF DESIRE by Marc Lewis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 14, 2015

"A thought-provoking, industry-minded, and polarizing perspective on the neurocircuitry of human desire and compulsion."
An argument against classifying addiction as a chronic "brain disease." Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 7, 2015

"The author believes that anyone willing to change will be able to do so, and his reassuring tone and plethora of case histories offer considered advice and generous encouragement."
It's good to feel good about yourself. Read full book review >
THE ACHIEVEMENT HABIT by Bernard Roth
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 7, 2015

"Effective methods to help in the process of making positive changes in one's life."
Tested methods for obtaining the life you really want. Read full book review >
HOW DID I GET HERE? by Jesse Browner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 30, 2015

"A searching, occasionally profound collection/memoir."
A United Nations staffer and novelist meditates on the question of "how…the life we live relate[s] to lives we might have lived or ought to have lived." Read full book review >
STIR by Jessica Fechtor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2015

"The recipes are simple and uncomplicated; many of them have a handful of ingredients but are prepared in a way that might surprise you. Fechtor's book could be described the same way."
Dealing with the aftereffects of an aneurysm through a love of cooking. Read full book review >
BLACKOUT by Sarah Hepola
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2015

"A treasure trove of hard truths mined from a life soaked in booze."
A razor-sharp memoir that reveals the woman behind the wine glass. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >