Psychology Book Reviews (page 2)

ADHD NATION by Alan Schwarz
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"In this powerful, necessary book, Schwarz exposes the dirty secrets of the growing ADHD epidemic."
A troubling look at the systemic overdiagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and a chilling analysis of the effect ADHD medications have on patients, especially children. Read full book review >
RAMPAGE NATION by Louis Klarevas
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A deeply researched, clearly written study that educates while it horrifies."
Klarevas (Global Affairs/Univ. of Massachusetts-Boston) shares his research showing that mass shootings are more common than widely believed but can be decreased by addressing the conditions common to all the massacres. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"In what is a growing genre, Aiken provides a thoughtful approach to the attractions, distractions, and pitfalls of our digital culture."
An expert in the field of cyberpsychology looks at how the interface between digital technology and our daily activities impacts social and personal relationships. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A savvy, sharp study that only occasionally loses readers in the psychological brambles."
A personal and clinical deconstruction of the narcissistic personality. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Insightful, encouraging, and universally practical."
A New York Times business reporter shares her wisdom on creating and completing that elusive back-burner dream project. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"More Adorno than Negroponte but of interest to students of contemporary first-world culture."
Is Airbnb the beginning of our end? Perhaps not, but, as this elegant meditation explores, it's just one more sign of our sterile, disembodied times. Read full book review >
PATIENT H.M. by Luke Dittrich
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A mesmerizing, maddening story and a model of journalistic investigation."
Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King in a piercing study of one of psychiatric medicine's darker hours. Read full book review >
WAKING THE SPIRIT by Andrew Schulman
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"An inspirational testament to the limitless benefits of music and its role in health care."
A near-death survivor and career musician demonstrates the true healing power of music. Read full book review >
IDIOT BRAIN by Dean Burnett
Released: July 26, 2016

"Burnett should give a TED talk. His book will appeal immensely to general readers and deserves a place on college reading lists."
A neuroscientist's irreverent guide to the brain. Read full book review >
Released: July 19, 2016

"The book reads like an extended game of Trivial Pursuit, featuring some who play very well and many more who play very poorly."
The story of the dumbing-down of the American brain, as we have all become increasingly dependent on letting our computers think for us. Read full book review >
Released: July 19, 2016

"A successful and detailed guide to using mindfulness to heal and redirect negative emotions."
In this self-improvement title, Heitler (The Power of Two Workbook: Communication Skills for A Strong & Loving Marriage, 2003, etc.) explores several major psychological problems, including anger, fear, anxiety, and addictive behaviors. Read full book review >
THE JAGUAR MAN by Lara Naughton
Released: July 12, 2016

"A painful, provocative, and poetically cathartic memoir of survival."
A writer and teacher chronicles her terrifying experience with kidnapping and rape and how she survived the ensuing trauma. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >