Psychology Book Reviews (page 2)

THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. DOYLE by Daniel L. Friedman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"At first muddled and confusing, the book goes on to raise intriguing questions and possibilities for fans of both men."
A father-and-son team exposes the similarities of two very strange men, Jack the Ripper and Arthur Conan Doyle. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"An intelligent, if at times self-aggrandizing, celebration of lying and love."
An admitted liar muses about deception. Read full book review >

TALES FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BRAIN by Michael S. Gazzaniga
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A lively appreciation of both the complexity of the human mind and the scientific enterprise."
"How on earth does the brain enable mind?" That is the still-to-be-answered question posed by Gazzaniga (Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain, 2011, etc.), the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.Read full book review >
I AM NOT A SLUT by Leora Tanenbaum
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A significant, spirited analysis sure to be embraced by feminists and deserving of wide attention."
An enthusiastic update on the state of female sexual liberation in contemporary society. Read full book review >
UNREQUITED by Lisa A. Phillips
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"Compassionate and, perhaps for some readers, encouraging."
A sympathetic exploration of the misunderstood phenomenon of women and "the stubbornness of romantic obsession." Read full book review >

MIND CHANGE by Susan Greenfield
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"Challenging, stimulating perspective from an informed neuroscientist on a complex, fast-moving, hugely consequential field."
A comprehensive overview of the scientific research—albeit in its infancy—into the effects of cybertechnology on our brains. Read full book review >
THE EVIL HOURS by David J. Morris
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"An eye-opening investigation of war's casualties."
An exploration of the enduring human cost of war. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Ashton makes compelling arguments about creativity and genius but continues to belabor them long after readers have gotten the point."
As a writer on technology and coiner of the phrase "the Internet of Things," Ashton seems to be a particularly creative type. But the "secret" of the subtitle is that there is no secret, no magic and no mystery. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO COULDN'T STOP by David Adam
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Well-researched, witty, honest and irreverent, Adam's account proves as irresistible as his subject."
An engrossing first-person study of obsessive-compulsive disorder from within and without. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 16, 2015

"Wide-ranging, informative and entertaining, especially for parents and educators."
How our bodies and minds work in tandem. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Worth a look for those who enjoy self-help books focused on healthy lifestyles."
Holistic health counselor and co-star of the award-winning documentary Super Size Me, Jamieson (Vegan Cooking for Dummies, 2010, etc.) tackles the age-old question of what women really want.Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A solid resource for parents and educators working with middle school girls; the program goals can be adapted to other issues."
Leadership consultant Radin's debut book describes her after-school program that empowers middle school girls through animal rescue. The book was co-authored by health and fitness writer Goldman (Locker Room Diaries: The Naked Truth about Women, Body Image, and Re-imagining the "Perfect" Body, 2006, etc.).Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >