Psychology Book Reviews (page 2)

SOUL MACHINE by George Makari
Released: Oct. 19, 2015

"An erudite book that reveals how and why the understanding of consciousness still eludes us."
Throughout Western history, the nature of humans' inner lives has vexed philosophers, physicians, scientists, and theologians. Makari (Psychiatry/Weill Cornell Medical Coll.; Revolution in Mind: The Creation of Psychoanalysis, 2008) offers a thorough examination of debates about soul, spirit, and what we now call "mind." Read full book review >
Sleep Secrets by Ronald M. Bazar
Released: Oct. 14, 2015

"A layperson's guide to possible impediments to successful sleep, including a variety of natural cures that lack strong scientific backing."
A guide to overcoming sleep problems, offering solutions that range from the ordinary to the esoteric. Read full book review >

NONSENSE by Jamie Holmes
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"The author's bright anecdotes and wide-ranging research stories are certain to please many readers."
New America Foundation Future Tense fellow Holmes, a former research coordinator in the department of economics at Harvard, debuts with a provocative analysis of the roots of uncertainty. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A provocative challenge to the tendency to elevate ideology over thoughtfulness. The author amply shows how 'stability is blissful, but it may also be illusory, hiding the buildup of hidden risks or nurturing behavior that will bring the stability to an end.'"
Societies and economies "are not inherently stable," writes Wall Street Journal chief economics commentator Ip (The Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World, 2010) in this eye-opening book about risk-taking and crisis.Read full book review >
THE TRUTH by Neil Strauss
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Some readers may have no sympathy for the author, but he delivers an emotionally charged, provocative memoir of a man learning to confront his sexual demons."
Rolling Stone scribe and infamous Lothario Strauss (Everyone Loves You When You're Dead: Journeys into Fame and Madness, 2011, etc.) chronicles a lascivious seesaw battle between monogamy and debauchery. Read full book review >

HOMEFRONT 911 by Stacy Bannerman
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An activist, Bannerman has set up programs for women, drafted legislation, and testified before congressional committees. Here, she takes her message to a broader public in a disturbing cry for help."
"Attention must be paid" is the demand being made by a woman who knows from hard experience what it is like to be married to a combat veteran with PTSD. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Conclusion: an unproven but undoubtedly provocative case. Expect dissent and discussion."
A pitch for infections as a major cause of mental illness, arguing for a paradigm shift from mainstream psychiatric doctrine. Read full book review >
Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An often masterful hybrid of self-help and firsthand history."
Haas (Dakini Power, 2013) offers a combination of science reportage, memoir, and advice on the subject of trauma.Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 5, 2015

"A mixed bag but of interest to health policy wonks and activists."
A scion of an American dynasty recounts years of addiction, mental illness, and family dysfunction—matters that, as the title suggests, are altogether too ordinary. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Fascinating and terrifying portraits of saints and ministers of grace."
A New Yorker staff writer delves into the strange lives and curious mindsets of extreme altruists. Read full book review >
SCREAM by Margee Kerr
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Kerr frames her colorful narrative of her scientific objectives with autobiographical details of her own thrill-seeking experiences."
The author's quest to understand the psychology of thrill-seeking and fear. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"In clear, accessible, and upbeat prose, Ingram demonstrates his optimism about the possibility of aging with an agile mind, and he is hopeful about finding an effective treatment for sufferers."
What science has learned about the brain, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >