Psychology Book Reviews (page 3)

WHAT LOVE IS by Carrie Jenkins
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Those who don't already have a good idea what love is before beginning the volume won't have gained one by its conclusion."
In her first book, Jenkins (Philosophy/Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver) examines romantic love as a phenomenon at the intersection of biology and social convention. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Thirty days on LSD therapy makes for a fascinating trip, indeed, and a learning opportunity for readers interested in the past and present therapeutic uses for psychedelic drugs."
How self-administering tiny doses of LSD abated the disintegration of the author's mental health and family life. Read full book review >

THE ART OF BEING FREE by James Poulos
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Provocative assertions buried in a confusing presentation."
A journalist expands on Alexis de Tocqueville's cultural critiques of American life. Read full book review >
IS IT ALL IN YOUR HEAD? by Suzanne O'Sullivan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"An intriguing look at how mental processes affect and alter our views—and feelings—of health and illness."
Feeling out of sorts? Take two imaginary aspirin and call us in the morning. Read full book review >
The Attachment Bond by Virginia M. Shiller
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 2017

"A useful, thorough survey of a cornerstone theory, if somewhat dry at times."
A clinical psychologist explains the five-decade history of attachment theory and its relation to personal development. Read full book review >

THE POWER OF MEANING by Emily Esfahani Smith
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A good choice for self-help seekers but not likely for others."
Common-sense suggestions on how to feel that life is worth living. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Accessible, highly effective methods for raising well-behaved children."
Advice for parents on handling toddlers to pre-tweens. Read full book review >
RADICALIZATION by Farhad Khosrokhavar
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A timely, systematic breakdown of thee reasons for radicalization."
A French scholar delineates the attractions of violent extremism, specifically jihadi Islam. Read full book review >
THE STRESS TEST by Ian Robertson
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"An intriguing overview of important developments in brain research, specifically as it relates to finding 'the right mental balance we need for each challenge that faces us.'"
A veteran neuroscientist and clinical psychologist explores the changes that occur in our brains depending upon how we deal with challenging situations. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A worthy primer on the science of comprehending language at the visible, symbolic level of print, a place that requires plenty of brain power and years of practice to navigate."
Johnny can't read—and too often his teachers can only guess why. Read full book review >
REST by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A useful holiday gift at a time when New Year's resolutions will be on the agenda."
Why being a workaholic is not the key to greater productivity. Read full book review >
AGAINST EMPATHY by Paul Bloom
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"An intriguing counterattack to modern psychological cynicism."
The potential of empathy to lead to cruelty prompts Bloom (Psychology/Yale Univ.; Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, 2013, etc.) to promote the function of compassion, which is informed by rational deliberation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >