Psychology Book Reviews (page 3)

TRISTIMANIA by Jay Griffiths
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Fortunately for everyone who has been affected by bipolar disorder, Griffiths—and her notebooks—survived the journey."
A visceral account of the turmoil experienced within a manic-depressive breakdown. Read full book review >
WHY YOU LOVE MUSIC by John Powell
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 14, 2016

"A succinct summation of all that has come before, much of which readers will already know before beginning the book."
A buffet of insights and oddities regarding "the psychology of music." Read full book review >

INVISIBLE INFLUENCE by Jonah Berger
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 14, 2016

"Of particular interest to those selling messages of various stripes—marketers, advertisers, etc."
If Johnny told you to jump off a cliff, would you do it? If you're susceptible, like most people, to garden-variety social influence, then the answer is likely to be yes. Read full book review >
BUT WHAT IF WE'RE WRONG? by Chuck Klosterman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Replete with lots of nifty, whimsical footnotes, this clever, speculative book challenges our beliefs with jocularity and perspicacity."
An inquiry into why we'll probably be wrong about almost everything. Read full book review >
ORDINARILY WELL by Peter D. Kramer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Written with the compassion, verve, and style that are the author's trademark, this book offers an invaluable overview on the state of treatment and the options available."
The 1993 publication of Kramer's Listening to Prozac set off a controversy about the use of mind-altering drugs in the treatment of mental illness that has still to be resolved, a situation the author finds deplorable. Read full book review >

CHANCERS by Susan Stellin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"An emotionally complex and intensely personal binary memoir of addiction and sustainable love."
The unconventional love story between an emerging author and the troubled man she discovers to be a hard-core drug addict. Read full book review >
THE DIVINE MADNESS OF PHILIP K. DICK by Kyle Arnold
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"An inquiry into the SF master's mind that will interest only the most devoted of Dick's fans."
Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) sits on the couch for some deep analysis. Read full book review >
STRANGER IN THE MIRROR by Robert V. Levine
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2016

"A provocative and convincing case of the malleability of what we think of as 'our self, which in reality is a multiplicity of characters' developed through time and circumstances."
A multiangled exploration of the slippery notion of self-identity. Read full book review >
TRIBE by Sebastian Junger
HISTORY
Released: May 24, 2016

"The themes implicit in the author's bestsellers are explicit in this slim yet illuminating volume."
A short book with a solid argument about the downside of civilization's progress. Read full book review >
HELPING CHILDREN SUCCEED by Paul Tough
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"Informative and effective methods to help children overcome issues and thrive at home and in school."
Straightforward advice on how to help children overcome adversity at home and in school. Read full book review >
READING AND WRITING CANCER by Susan Gubar
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal."
For cancer sufferers, words can lift the spirit. Read full book review >
UNFORBIDDEN PLEASURES by Adam Phillips
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"A dense, challenging, provocative meditation on morality and identity."
What would society look like if it did not promote the idea "that we are primarily a danger to ourselves and others"? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >