Psychology Book Reviews (page 4)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"A heartfelt pursuit of enlightenment and its causes, a subject that calls for an even more dynamic treatment."
Combining anecdotes, awareness exercises, and examinations of contemporary neurological research, Newberg and Waldman (How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist, 2009) seek to identify pathways to enlightenment.Read full book review >
SMARTER FASTER BETTER by Charles Duhigg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Highly informative and entertaining and certain to have wide appeal."
Why some people are more productive than others. Read full book review >

THE HAPPINESS EQUATION by Neil Pasricha
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 8, 2016

"Some of the book is New Age pabulum and some painfully common-sensical. But some of it is very good and well worth a look."
A search for "simple models to decide what to do" to be happy. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A useful and educative primer introducing but not elaborating on a new clinical perspective on addiction."
A lucid examination of addiction and treatment from a neurobiological perspective. Read full book review >
WHEN WE ARE NO MORE by Abby Smith Rumsey
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Though the author's analysis stops short of cultural apocalypse, it does show how radically things have changed and why this is cause for concern."
An analysis of the significance of cultural memory and a warning about its fragility in the digital era. Read full book review >

THE ART OF RISK by Kayt Sukel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Not an in-depth trip but an enjoyable tour."
A science journalist who once took risks but now plays it safe explores what scientists know about risk-taking and why some people are risk takers and others are not. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing exploration of a unique hypothesis with broad implications."
An exploration of the quest for a link between high-functioning autistic individuals and child prodigies, co-authored by mother-daughter team Ruthsatz (Psychology/Ohio State Univ.) and journalist Stephens. Read full book review >
HOW TO WEEP IN PUBLIC by Jacqueline Novak
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Best read in short spurts with a stiff drink in hand, this book is an amusing look at depression that could inspire a depressed person to rejoin society."
A comedian's humorous take on depression. Read full book review >
THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Although art may be generated by loneliness, writes Laing in this illuminating, enriching book, it has a significant 'capacity to create intimacy.'"
A British journalist and cultural critic investigates how loneliness shapes art. Read full book review >
REASONS TO STAY ALIVE by Matt Haig
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A vibrant, encouraging depiction of a sinister disorder."
A British novelist turns to autobiography to report the manifold symptoms and management of his debilitating disease, depression. Read full book review >
AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
THE TIDES OF MIND by David Gelernter
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"Eschewing research in favor of literature and Freud, Gelernter delivers a personal, reasonable, nonscientific analysis of the mind."
Everyone agrees that computers do not employ reason; they compute. This harmony dissolves when the discussion turns to the future, where vastly more powerful machines will develop sentience and feelings—or not. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >