Psychology Book Reviews (page 4)

RISING STRONG by Brené Brown
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An innovative one-two-three-punch approach to self-help and healing from an author who has helped countless readers change their lives."
More solid advice from the author of Daring Greatly (2012) and The Gifts of Imperfection (2010).Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"Simple, effective procedures that can be easily incorporated into even the busiest lifestyle."
How a year of being thankful led to big changes in a woman's life. Read full book review >

TRIUMPH OF THE HEART by Megan Feldman Bettencourt
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Bettencourt takes a broad view of opportunities small and large for forgiveness, and in doing so, she provides hope for a way forward that focuses more on acceptance than retribution."
One writer's journey through learning about the many forms forgiveness can take. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Provocative but open to the charge of one-sided overcorrection."
Consultant Markova (Wide Open: On Living with Purpose and Passion, 2008, etc.) and co-author McArthur argue that current thinking about leadership methods must change in the coming century.Read full book review >
UPSIDE by Jim Rendon
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Rendon offers not just a spoonful of medicine, but also a furtherance of works by Frankl, Abraham Maslow, and his new, revitalized acquaintances."
Journalist Rendon examines the question of how trauma changes people, reshaping their lives and senses of self. Read full book review >

THE MAN IN THE MONSTER by Martha Elliott
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A disturbing and multifaceted exposé of both a ruthless killer and the sympathetic, merciful journalist at odds with his capital fate."
The story of a journalist's decadelong friendship with a convicted serial rapist and murderer. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A provocative examination of deep questions—not easy reading but worth sticking with, if only for the fascinating case studies."
Psychology and philosophy intersect in a study of mental states that raises the question of what we refer to when we say "myself." Read full book review >
What the Enemy Thinks by Gail Picco
Released: July 30, 2015

"Overdrawn yet readable portrait of collective advocacy and friendship at work, spearheaded by a valiant, relatable protagonist."
Former women's shelter counselor Picco, in her debut, traces the intertwining business and personal lives of an altruistic media consultancy executive. Read full book review >
Free Your Mind by Cortez R. Rainey
Released: July 16, 2015

"A highly accessible, comprehensive resource for all meditative skill levels that may also attract a few history buffs."
Rainey's debut seeks to introduce meditation to African-American audiences by integrating the historic figures of the Underground Railroad into its teachings. Read full book review >
Released: July 14, 2015

"Never fails to bring gratuitous academic heft to the instinctive, ancient principles of simple bartering."
Business school professors attempt to teach the art of negotiation with a mix of psychology and basic economic logic. Read full book review >
ANXIOUS by Joseph LeDoux
Released: July 14, 2015

"Not turgid enough for academia or lucid enough to be quality popular science, the book is a dense, detailed, often stimulating review of how the brain processes external threats."
This is no self-help book but rather a rigorous scientific analysis of brain function, heavy on research and theory. Read full book review >
LET'S BE LESS STUPID by Patricia Marx
Released: July 14, 2015

"A sly, irreverent take on the latest obsessions regarding self-improvement."
New Yorker staff writer Marx (Starting from Happy: A Novel, 2011, etc.), the first woman elected to the Harvard Lampoon, brings her wit and quirky curiosity to the timely topic of mental acuity.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >