Psychology Book Reviews (page 4)

HOW TO WEEP IN PUBLIC by Jacqueline Novak
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Best read in short spurts with a stiff drink in hand, this book is an amusing look at depression that could inspire a depressed person to rejoin society."
A comedian's humorous take on depression. Read full book review >
THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Although art may be generated by loneliness, writes Laing in this illuminating, enriching book, it has a significant 'capacity to create intimacy.'"
A British journalist and cultural critic investigates how loneliness shapes art. Read full book review >

REASONS TO STAY ALIVE by Matt Haig
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A vibrant, encouraging depiction of a sinister disorder."
A British novelist turns to autobiography to report the manifold symptoms and management of his debilitating disease, depression. Read full book review >
AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
THE TIDES OF MIND by David Gelernter
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"Eschewing research in favor of literature and Freud, Gelernter delivers a personal, reasonable, nonscientific analysis of the mind."
Everyone agrees that computers do not employ reason; they compute. This harmony dissolves when the discussion turns to the future, where vastly more powerful machines will develop sentience and feelings—or not. Read full book review >

I Lost My Child To Cancer by Shelly Dubois
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 18, 2016

"A painful, uplifting, and beautiful meditation on loss and recovery."
A mother discusses the loss of her daughter to cancer and her own emotional healing in the aftermath. Read full book review >
Nani's Tale by Corey Fair
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 17, 2016

"A taut and rewarding tale about a young girl's frightening life and last-minute rescue.
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A little girl struggles to find love and salvation against terrifying odds in this debut novel. Read full book review >
FREE REFILLS by Peter Grinspoon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Grinspoon's story is instructive, with readers potentially learning more than the author has."
The memoir of a doctor whose addiction derailed his career offers flashes of illumination amid clouds of defensiveness and denial. Read full book review >
UNTANGLED by Lisa Damour
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Expert information and counsel on helping parents raise well-rounded girls."
The director of the Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls offers parents concrete advice on how to help their teenage daughters navigate the often tumultuous teenage years. Read full book review >
THE GIRL BEHIND THE DOOR by John Brooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Brooks explains Casey's disorder and available help in terms that will help anyone struggling with a difficult child. Teachers, analysts, and parents alike can find relief and hope in this book."
In his first book, Brooks shares his search for answers about his adopted daughter and the unknown childhood trauma that drove her to suicide at age 17. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An academic yet concise, fresh, and deeply informed look at how we read."
How does the study of disability help us to understand stories? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An optimistic and engagingly well-told life story that incorporates scientific investigation into its altruistic message."
A Stanford neurosurgeon and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education relates how to achieve lofty life goals by harnessing the power of both the brain and the heart. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >