Psychology Book Reviews (page 4)

HOW WE ARE by Vincent Deary
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 2015

"A psychologist puts humanity on the client's couch, but a cure seems unlikely."
Thoughts on the human condition from a cognitive psychologist-turned-armchair philosopher. Read full book review >
FEELING SMART by Eyal Winter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"No special knowledge of game theory or of economic theory is required to follow Winter's arguments, and his insights about human behavior range over a variety of areas: politics, religion, sex, marriage and art. A lively, accessible work."
A Humboldt Prize-winning Israeli scholar of behavioral economics advances the concept of rational emotions in a book filled with fascinating studies and personal anecdotes. Read full book review >

WHAT DO I DO NOW? by Stephen D. Miller
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 10, 2014

"An intellectual but nontechnical concept of human psychological development that offers useful prescriptions for self-improvement."
Miller's debutnonfiction book asks a question that's easy for readers to lose sight of amidst the hurdles of daily living: am I living a meaningful life? Read full book review >
A COUNTRY CALLED CHILDHOOD by Jay Griffiths
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A provocative critique of modern society."
Griffiths (Wild: An Elemental Journey, 2006, etc.) focuses on the lives of children in her continued exploration of the role of nature in giving meaning to our lives. Read full book review >
THE RESILIENCE DIVIDEND by Judith Rodin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A convincing argument that becoming resilient is not only possible, but essential; food for thought for all and especially recommended for community leaders."
A revealing examination of the anatomy of resilience, the capacity to withstand and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. Read full book review >

IT'S NOT ABOUT THE SHARK by David Niven
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"A smooth repackaging of how to think outside the box but offering little heft and nothing new."
Niven (100 Simple Secrets series) suggests that we right the rules of the game and not let our problems command the playing field. Read full book review >
EMPATHY by Roman Krznaric
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Useful advice that promotes a more contented, fulfilling lifestyle."
School of Life founder Krznaric (How Should We Live?: Great Ideas from the Past for Everyday Life, 2013, etc.) presents methods to increase a person's ability to look at situations through another's eyes.Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Entertaining, enlightening and refreshingly light on psychobabble."
A researcher who is both a scholar and an experienced motivational speaker makes the subject of personality psychology come to life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An adept introduction to an innovative thinker whose dramatic flair and sometimes-messianic personality tended to overshadow his accomplishments."
The son of the psychiatrist who founded psychodrama examines the life of his "famous, eccentric, and controversial" father and traces the evolution and impact of his ideas. Read full book review >
THROWN by Kerry Howley
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An original fusion of topic and stance that will appeal to fans of NPR-style social investigations."
A philosophical examination of the maligned subculture of mixed martial arts "cage" fighting. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"If Navarro had spent more time exploring less obvious characteristics and let his profiling knowledge shine, this book could have been a must-read. As it is, it won't stand out from the crowd."
A book-length warning about the dangers possibly lurking behind every co-worker, friend, significant other or person on the street and how to identify those who may cause harm. Read full book review >
MY MYSTERIOUS SON by Dick Russell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Not all readers will be convinced, but Russell provides an earnest and eye-opening account of the possible thin line between a psychotic disorder and mysticism."
A memoir about the tight bond between a father and his mentally ill son. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >