Psychology Book Reviews (page 4)

PRETENTIOUSNESS by Dan Fox
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not as provocative as it might be, but never pretentious."
A short book puts a positive spin on a term of almost universal disparagement. Read full book review >
NOTHING EVER DIES by Viet Thanh Nguyen
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Essentially a critical study, Nguyen's work is a powerful reflection on how we choose to remember and forget."
A scholarly exploration of memory and the Vietnam War from an author "born in Vietnam but made in America." Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"With its academic tone and spirited, convincing vision, revolutionary new insights can be gleaned from this book on how to approach life's multifarious situations with both heart and head."
A popular college instructor explains how ancient Chinese thought can be applied to everyday life. Read full book review >
SOAR ABOVE by Steven Stosny
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 5, 2016

"In a book that will appeal to readers devoted to self-betterment, a relationship expert divides the brain into two parts and shows how to let the mature side win when under stress."
How to access your higher brain for a better life. Read full book review >
BECOMING WISE by Krista Tippett
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A hopeful consideration of the human potential for enlightenment."
Five key words serve as guideposts in a search for wisdom. Read full book review >

THE GRAY RHINO by Michele Wucker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A valuable guide for individuals and policymakers who want to act when they see the lights of an oncoming train."
An analysis of "highly obvious but ignored threats"—from failing infrastructure to financial crises to climate change—and what can be done to prevent disastrous outcomes. Read full book review >
ON BEING RAPED by Raymond M. Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Courageous, sobering, and cathartic."
A searing, self-reflective account of adult male rape. Read full book review >
UNBROKEN BRAIN by Maia Szalavitz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A dense blending of self-exposure, surprising statistics, and solid science reporting that presents addiction as a misunderstood coping mechanism, a problem whose true nature is not yet recognized by policymakers or the public."
A proposal for a new way of looking at drug addiction that offers a fresh approach to managing it. Read full book review >
AUTISM ADULTHOOD by Susan Senator
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"The challenges are ongoing, and Senator is honest in acknowledging the limits of any insights one might glean from her son's story. That acknowledgement, however, serves the book in its shared solidarity, of reaching out to always ask questions. As an emotional resource, her book is excellent."
A wide-ranging memoir and guide to autism in adulthood. Read full book review >
THE SLEEP REVOLUTION by Arianna Huffington
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A disappointing addition to the celebrity self-help shelf."
A book about sleep deprivation from an author well-versed on the subject. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >
JUNK by Alison Stewart
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 2016

"Absorbing and enjoyably compelling research on the packrat conundrum in our society."
Quirky, immersive report on the "who, what, where, when, and why of junk." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >