Psychology Book Reviews (page 5)

PINPOINT by Greg Milner
Released: May 3, 2016

"Milner has done his homework, assuring readers will be satisfied, educated, and occasionally amazed."
What universal digital service is essential to the world's infrastructure and our daily lives? Yes, the Internet, but more fundamentally, the Global Positioning System. Read full book review >
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >

Be YourSelf by Akshya Vasudev
Released: April 28, 2016

"Thought-provoking, Hindu-focused mental health commentary."
A psychiatrist discusses his midlife embrace of Vedanta philosophy and related insights on depression, anxiety, and other subjects in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >
OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY by Brian Christian
Released: April 19, 2016

"An entertaining, intelligently presented book for the numerate and computer literate."
We are always connected: this is both our blessing and our curse. The problem "is that we're always buffered," just a step behind the flood of information flowing toward and past us, all the books and movies and other ingredients of what the authors call "bufferbloat."Read full book review >

CAPTURE by David A. Kessler
Released: April 12, 2016

"A reasonable theory of the science behind extreme behavior illustrated by excessive but gripping case histories."
Why do we do things—overeat, obsess, fight, commit suicide—that make it seem like our rational minds have been hijacked by something we cannot control? Read full book review >
Released: April 12, 2016

"A challenging and provocative inquiry into how we see the world…now, 'the point is to change it.'"
A semiotics for the masses. Read full book review >
Released: April 12, 2016

"Good advice backed by research coupled with personal reflections by a father on how to let children grow up to be individuals rather than miniature versions of their parents."
A man opens up about his shortcomings as a father. Read full book review >
Self-Love by Wei Chen
Released: April 10, 2016

"An uneven self-help book that still offers a solid starting point for those trying to discover why romantic happiness eludes them."
Meditations on the true nature of love. Read full book review >
WARRIOR by Theresa Larson
Released: April 5, 2016

"A courageous and inspiring memoir."
A doctor of physical therapy and former Marine lieutenant tells the story of her painful struggle with bulimia. Read full book review >
Released: April 5, 2016

"A highly relatable collection of anecdotes that serves as a valuable crash course on the pitfalls, seductions, and rewards of love."
A psychoanalyst dissects the raptures and torments of love through a series of case studies. Read full book review >
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not as provocative as it might be, but never pretentious."
A short book puts a positive spin on a term of almost universal disparagement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >