Psychology Book Reviews (page 5)

GIRLS AND SEX by Peggy Orenstein
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 29, 2016

"Ample, valuable information on the way young women in America perceive and react to their sexual environment."
An examination of the newest trends in the sex lives of young women in America. Read full book review >
SWITCHED ON by John Elder Robison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A fascinating companion to the previous memoirs by this masterful storyteller."
The bestselling author shares his experience as a participant in a cutting-edge study of the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brains of people on the autism spectrum. Read full book review >

ON BEING HUMAN by Jerome Kagan
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 22, 2016

"'Nature is obsessed with particularities,' writes Kagan. A particularly fruitful book for students of the mind."
Nature or nurture? The answer, writes Kagan (The Human Spark: The Science of Human Development, 2013, etc.), eminent Harvard emeritus professor of psychology, is yes.Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
LIFE REIMAGINED by Barbara Bradley Hagerty
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"For midlifers eager to 'create a new habit of mind,' Hagerty is a rousing cheerleader."
An upbeat look at the joys of middle age. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"A heartfelt pursuit of enlightenment and its causes, a subject that calls for an even more dynamic treatment."
Combining anecdotes, awareness exercises, and examinations of contemporary neurological research, Newberg and Waldman (How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist, 2009) seek to identify pathways to enlightenment.Read full book review >
SMARTER FASTER BETTER by Charles Duhigg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Highly informative and entertaining and certain to have wide appeal."
Why some people are more productive than others. Read full book review >
THE HAPPINESS EQUATION by Neil Pasricha
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 8, 2016

"Some of the book is New Age pabulum and some painfully common-sensical. But some of it is very good and well worth a look."
A search for "simple models to decide what to do" to be happy. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A useful and educative primer introducing but not elaborating on a new clinical perspective on addiction."
A lucid examination of addiction and treatment from a neurobiological perspective. Read full book review >
WHEN WE ARE NO MORE by Abby Smith Rumsey
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Though the author's analysis stops short of cultural apocalypse, it does show how radically things have changed and why this is cause for concern."
An analysis of the significance of cultural memory and a warning about its fragility in the digital era. Read full book review >
THE ART OF RISK by Kayt Sukel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Not an in-depth trip but an enjoyable tour."
A science journalist who once took risks but now plays it safe explores what scientists know about risk-taking and why some people are risk takers and others are not. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing exploration of a unique hypothesis with broad implications."
An exploration of the quest for a link between high-functioning autistic individuals and child prodigies, co-authored by mother-daughter team Ruthsatz (Psychology/Ohio State Univ.) and journalist Stephens. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >