Psychology Book Reviews (page 5)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"In what is a growing genre, Aiken provides a thoughtful approach to the attractions, distractions, and pitfalls of our digital culture."
An expert in the field of cyberpsychology looks at how the interface between digital technology and our daily activities impacts social and personal relationships. Read full book review >
THE SELFISHNESS OF OTHERS by Kristin Dombek
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A savvy, sharp study that only occasionally loses readers in the psychological brambles."
A personal and clinical deconstruction of the narcissistic personality. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Insightful, encouraging, and universally practical."
A New York Times business reporter shares her wisdom on creating and completing that elusive back-burner dream project. Read full book review >
THE FOUR-DIMENSIONAL HUMAN by Laurence Scott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"More Adorno than Negroponte but of interest to students of contemporary first-world culture."
Is Airbnb the beginning of our end? Perhaps not, but, as this elegant meditation explores, it's just one more sign of our sterile, disembodied times. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A mesmerizing, maddening story and a model of journalistic investigation."
Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King in a piercing study of one of psychiatric medicine's darker hours. Read full book review >

WAKING THE SPIRIT by Andrew Schulman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"An inspirational testament to the limitless benefits of music and its role in health care."
A near-death survivor and career musician demonstrates the true healing power of music. Read full book review >
IDIOT BRAIN by Dean Burnett
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 26, 2016

"Burnett should give a TED talk. His book will appeal immensely to general readers and deserves a place on college reading lists."
A neuroscientist's irreverent guide to the brain. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 19, 2016

"The book reads like an extended game of Trivial Pursuit, featuring some who play very well and many more who play very poorly."
The story of the dumbing-down of the American brain, as we have all become increasingly dependent on letting our computers think for us. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 19, 2016

"A successful and detailed guide to using mindfulness to heal and redirect negative emotions."
In this self-improvement title, Heitler (The Power of Two Workbook: Communication Skills for A Strong & Loving Marriage, 2003, etc.) explores several major psychological problems, including anger, fear, anxiety, and addictive behaviors. Read full book review >
THE JAGUAR MAN by Lara Naughton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2016

"A painful, provocative, and poetically cathartic memoir of survival."
A writer and teacher chronicles her terrifying experience with kidnapping and rape and how she survived the ensuing trauma. Read full book review >
A BOOK ABOUT LOVE by Jonah Lehrer
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 12, 2016

"While the book adequately covers a good deal of research and systematically examines the rewards and challenges of intimacy, it doesn't make love sound like a whole lot of fun."
Journalist Lehrer addresses the power of human attachment. Read full book review >
THE VOYEUR'S MOTEL by Gay Talese
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2016

"Undoubtedly creepy and unnerving but also an entirely compelling slice of seamy American life."
The disturbing private world of the sleaziest motel manager since Norman Bates. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >