Psychology Book Reviews (page 6)

FREE REFILLS by Peter Grinspoon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Grinspoon's story is instructive, with readers potentially learning more than the author has."
The memoir of a doctor whose addiction derailed his career offers flashes of illumination amid clouds of defensiveness and denial. Read full book review >
UNTANGLED by Lisa Damour
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Expert information and counsel on helping parents raise well-rounded girls."
The director of the Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls offers parents concrete advice on how to help their teenage daughters navigate the often tumultuous teenage years. Read full book review >

THE GIRL BEHIND THE DOOR by John Brooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Brooks explains Casey's disorder and available help in terms that will help anyone struggling with a difficult child. Teachers, analysts, and parents alike can find relief and hope in this book."
In his first book, Brooks shares his search for answers about his adopted daughter and the unknown childhood trauma that drove her to suicide at age 17. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An academic yet concise, fresh, and deeply informed look at how we read."
How does the study of disability help us to understand stories? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An optimistic and engagingly well-told life story that incorporates scientific investigation into its altruistic message."
A Stanford neurosurgeon and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education relates how to achieve lofty life goals by harnessing the power of both the brain and the heart. Read full book review >

ORIGINALS by Adam Grant
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A mixed bag but of interest to readers looking to jump-start their creative powers and raise quick-witted children."
A blend of old and new—and sometimes original—informs this pop-science piece on creativity and its discontents. Read full book review >
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING LITTLE by Erika Christakis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A deep, provocative analysis of the current modes of teaching preschoolers and what should be changed to create a more effective learning environment for everyone."
An early childhood educator offers fresh advice on how parents and teachers should be interacting with preschool children to achieve better overall results. Read full book review >
WHILE THE CITY SLEPT by Eli Sanders
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An exceptional story of compelling interest in a time of school shootings, ethnic and class strife, and other unbound expressions of madness and illness."
Disturbing, sometimes-horrifying story of true crime and justice only partially served. Read full book review >
THE POINT IS by Lee Eisenberg
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Challengingly thought-provoking, Eisenberg's self-probing processes will encourage anyone to further ponder the meaning of life."
A meditation on the relevance of celebrating one's ever unfolding life story through the preservation and recognition of memories. Read full book review >
INVENTOLOGY by Pagan Kennedy
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"A delightful account of how inventors do what they do."
A journalist delivers an enthusiastic overview of inventions and the researchers that study them. Read full book review >
THE POWER OF FIFTY BITS by Bob Nease
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Although each strategy is common-sensical in its own right, taken together, they form a thoughtful, easy-to-digest approach for individuals and organizations seeking to foster better choices."
Useful advice on how to act on your good intentions. Read full book review >
THE END OF AVERAGE by Todd Rose
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"An intriguing view into the evolution and imperfections of our current system but lacking a clear path toward implementing the proposed principles of individuality."
Rose (Director, Mind, Brain, and Education Program/Harvard Univ.; Square Peg: My Story and What it Means for Raising Innovators, Visionaries, and Out-of-the-Box Thinkers, 2013) rejects the faulty benchmark of average and advocates for principles of individuality in schools and businesses. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >