Psychology Book Reviews (page 6)

THE POWER OF FIFTY BITS by Bob Nease
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Although each strategy is common-sensical in its own right, taken together, they form a thoughtful, easy-to-digest approach for individuals and organizations seeking to foster better choices."
Useful advice on how to act on your good intentions. Read full book review >
THE END OF AVERAGE by Todd Rose
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"An intriguing view into the evolution and imperfections of our current system but lacking a clear path toward implementing the proposed principles of individuality."
Rose (Director, Mind, Brain, and Education Program/Harvard Univ.; Square Peg: My Story and What it Means for Raising Innovators, Visionaries, and Out-of-the-Box Thinkers, 2013) rejects the faulty benchmark of average and advocates for principles of individuality in schools and businesses. Read full book review >

CURE by Jo Marchant
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A balanced, informative review of a controversial subject."
Marchant (The Shadow King: The Bizarre Afterlife of King Tut's Mummy, 2013 etc.) explores how traditional and alternative medicine overlap.Read full book review >
THE CONFIDENCE GAME by Maria Konnikova
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"With meticulous research and a facility for storytelling, Konnikova makes this intriguing topic absolutely riveting."
What makes a con artist, and why are we duped by them? New Yorker columnist Konnikova (Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, 2013) takes us deeply into the art and psychology of the con game.Read full book review >
WHY WE SNAP by R. Douglas Fields
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"The interplay between conscious and unconscious cognition is not unfamiliar territory, as readers of Daniel Kahneman or Malcolm Gladwell will recognize, but Fields' personal experience adds a fresh viewpoint to an intriguing subject."
A neuroscientist asks, "what triggers [our] deadly switch for violence and killing?" Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A fine exploration of the brain's ability to draw the story of our life, from experience and from thin air."
A neurologist tours current research on the mysteries of perception, habit, learning, memory, and language—our very selfhood and identity—and their underlying brain mechanics. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial yet entertaining romp."
Where to find innovators. Read full book review >
POLITICAL ANIMALS by Rick Shenkman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An amiable tour of the socioscientific evidence that accounts for our political miscalculations."
An explanation of how our brains are simply not built for politics in the modern world. Read full book review >
IN THE SLENDER MARGIN by Eve Joseph
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A literate, free-association meditation on the final fact of life."
A fine blend of memoir, contemplation, and reporting by a woman who spent more than 20 years as a counselor in a Victoria, British Columbia, hospice. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Solid evidence and numerous examples show the many traits that comprise the creative mind."
A close look at how the minds of creative people work. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"A well-rounded discussion of common mental problems and strategies for dealing with them."
The chief psychiatrist at Amen Clinics offers a holistic approach to treating an array of mental disorders. Read full book review >
THE COLLAPSE OF PARENTING by Leonard Sax
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"With the author's solid advice, parents have a good shot at achieving these goals."
A comprehensive breakdown of where parents have gone awry and how they can get back on track to teach virtue and character to their children. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >