Psychology Book Reviews (page 8)

POLITICAL ANIMALS by Rick Shenkman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An amiable tour of the socioscientific evidence that accounts for our political miscalculations."
An explanation of how our brains are simply not built for politics in the modern world. Read full book review >
IN THE SLENDER MARGIN by Eve Joseph
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A literate, free-association meditation on the final fact of life."
A fine blend of memoir, contemplation, and reporting by a woman who spent more than 20 years as a counselor in a Victoria, British Columbia, hospice. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Solid evidence and numerous examples show the many traits that comprise the creative mind."
A close look at how the minds of creative people work. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"A well-rounded discussion of common mental problems and strategies for dealing with them."
The chief psychiatrist at Amen Clinics offers a holistic approach to treating an array of mental disorders. Read full book review >
THE COLLAPSE OF PARENTING by Leonard Sax
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"With the author's solid advice, parents have a good shot at achieving these goals."
A comprehensive breakdown of where parents have gone awry and how they can get back on track to teach virtue and character to their children. Read full book review >

The Brutal Truth by Jonathan Harnisch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 25, 2015

"A courageous, if difficult, self-portrait of one man's suffering as well as his hope for recovery.
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A collection of personal essays exploring the author's experiences battling schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 23, 2015

"A study that's well-suited to scientists and CTS-afflicted people, but the general public may not find it entirely digestible."
A debut work that offers insight into the psychological impact of suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Read full book review >
PRESENCE by Amy Cuddy
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 22, 2015

"An uneven book studded with genuine insights that public speakers will find useful."
An examination of the psychological and physiological mechanics that spark the precious, transitory sense of presence. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 16, 2015

"A practical, novel approach to the concept of self-help."
Debut author Obeidat provides a brief, Islam-influenced guide to increasing personal awareness and making changes to one's life. Read full book review >
WHAT KIND OF CREATURES ARE WE? by Noam Chomsky
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"Comprising lectures on distinctly separate topics, this short volume skims the surface of the diversity and complexity of Chomsky's expertise."
Chomsky (Emeritus, Linguistics and Philosophy/MIT; Because We Say So, 2015, etc.) reflects broadly on the nature of language, the limits of human cognition, and our role as social creatures in furthering the common good. Read full book review >
Moving Beyond Duality by Dorothy I. Riddle
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 11, 2015

"A thoroughly researched argument for a nonbinary approach to understanding the world that's likely to find both fervent adherents and strong critics."
A manifesto and manual for readers looking to expand their capacities for kindness and mindfulness while also minimizing harm in the world at large. Read full book review >
THE CHALLENGE OF THINGS by A.C. Grayling
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A spirited collection of provocative pathways."
A new collection of essays from Grayling (Philosophy/New Coll. of the Humanities, London; The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism, 2014, etc.), whose distinguished record of accomplishments in the humanities and public service is recognized internationally.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >