Psychology Book Reviews (page 8)

VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >
Be YourSelf by Akshya Vasudev
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2016

"Thought-provoking, Hindu-focused mental health commentary."
A psychiatrist discusses his midlife embrace of Vedanta philosophy and related insights on depression, anxiety, and other subjects in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >

OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY by Brian Christian
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"An entertaining, intelligently presented book for the numerate and computer literate."
We are always connected: this is both our blessing and our curse. The problem "is that we're always buffered," just a step behind the flood of information flowing toward and past us, all the books and movies and other ingredients of what the authors call "bufferbloat."Read full book review >
CAPTURE by David A. Kessler
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 12, 2016

"A reasonable theory of the science behind extreme behavior illustrated by excessive but gripping case histories."
Why do we do things—overeat, obsess, fight, commit suicide—that make it seem like our rational minds have been hijacked by something we cannot control? Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A challenging and provocative inquiry into how we see the world…now, 'the point is to change it.'"
A semiotics for the masses. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"Good advice backed by research coupled with personal reflections by a father on how to let children grow up to be individuals rather than miniature versions of their parents."
A man opens up about his shortcomings as a father. Read full book review >
Self-Love by Wei Chen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 10, 2016

"An uneven self-help book that still offers a solid starting point for those trying to discover why romantic happiness eludes them."
Meditations on the true nature of love. Read full book review >
WARRIOR by Theresa Larson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A courageous and inspiring memoir."
A doctor of physical therapy and former Marine lieutenant tells the story of her painful struggle with bulimia. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN CONDOM by Jeanne Safer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 5, 2016

"A highly relatable collection of anecdotes that serves as a valuable crash course on the pitfalls, seductions, and rewards of love."
A psychoanalyst dissects the raptures and torments of love through a series of case studies. Read full book review >
PRETENTIOUSNESS by Dan Fox
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not as provocative as it might be, but never pretentious."
A short book puts a positive spin on a term of almost universal disparagement. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Essentially a critical study, Nguyen's work is a powerful reflection on how we choose to remember and forget."
A scholarly exploration of memory and the Vietnam War from an author "born in Vietnam but made in America." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >