Psychology Book Reviews (page 9)

I Just Want Out by Jodi Schuelke
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 7, 2016

"An insightful, empathetic strategy for separation."
Life coach Schuelke shares lessons that she learned from planning her exit from an emotionally abusive marriage in this debut how-to guide. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A useful and educative primer introducing but not elaborating on a new clinical perspective on addiction."
A lucid examination of addiction and treatment from a neurobiological perspective. Read full book review >

WHEN WE ARE NO MORE by Abby Smith Rumsey
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Though the author's analysis stops short of cultural apocalypse, it does show how radically things have changed and why this is cause for concern."
An analysis of the significance of cultural memory and a warning about its fragility in the digital era. Read full book review >
THE ART OF RISK by Kayt Sukel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2016

"Not an in-depth trip but an enjoyable tour."
A science journalist who once took risks but now plays it safe explores what scientists know about risk-taking and why some people are risk takers and others are not. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing exploration of a unique hypothesis with broad implications."
An exploration of the quest for a link between high-functioning autistic individuals and child prodigies, co-authored by mother-daughter team Ruthsatz (Psychology/Ohio State Univ.) and journalist Stephens. Read full book review >

HOW TO WEEP IN PUBLIC by Jacqueline Novak
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Best read in short spurts with a stiff drink in hand, this book is an amusing look at depression that could inspire a depressed person to rejoin society."
A comedian's humorous take on depression. Read full book review >
THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Although art may be generated by loneliness, writes Laing in this illuminating, enriching book, it has a significant 'capacity to create intimacy.'"
A British journalist and cultural critic investigates how loneliness shapes art. Read full book review >
REASONS TO STAY ALIVE by Matt Haig
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A vibrant, encouraging depiction of a sinister disorder."
A British novelist turns to autobiography to report the manifold symptoms and management of his debilitating disease, depression. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
THE TIDES OF MIND by David Gelernter
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"Eschewing research in favor of literature and Freud, Gelernter delivers a personal, reasonable, nonscientific analysis of the mind."
Everyone agrees that computers do not employ reason; they compute. This harmony dissolves when the discussion turns to the future, where vastly more powerful machines will develop sentience and feelings—or not. Read full book review >
I Lost My Child To Cancer by Shelly Dubois
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 18, 2016

"A painful, uplifting, and beautiful meditation on loss and recovery."
A mother discusses the loss of her daughter to cancer and her own emotional healing in the aftermath. Read full book review >
Nani's Tale by Corey Fair
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 17, 2016

"A taut and rewarding tale about a young girl's frightening life and last-minute rescue.
"
A little girl struggles to find love and salvation against terrifying odds in this debut novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >