Psychology Book Reviews (page 9)

SCREAM by Margee Kerr
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Kerr frames her colorful narrative of her scientific objectives with autobiographical details of her own thrill-seeking experiences."
The author's quest to understand the psychology of thrill-seeking and fear. Read full book review >
Survival Time: A Handbook for Surviving a Violent Incident by Aimee Olivas
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 27, 2015

"A short, reasonable guide to surviving violent situations.
"
A psychologist and his daughter offer readers advice on how to handle dangerous encounters. Read full book review >

THE END OF MEMORY by Jay Ingram
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"In clear, accessible, and upbeat prose, Ingram demonstrates his optimism about the possibility of aging with an agile mind, and he is hopeful about finding an effective treatment for sufferers."
What science has learned about the brain, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A firm response to currently accepted dog-training methods."
A convincing guide for dog owners as well as a memoir of instructive adventures set in nature. Read full book review >
Sightseeing in the Undiscovered Country by Louisa Oakley Green
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 23, 2015

"A compassionate, intelligent survey of supernatural experiences."
The wife of a psychic gathers reports from everyday people who believe they've glimpsed the beyond. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Clear, easily digestible pop psychology."
A guide to defending oneself from narcissism in the selfie age. Read full book review >
BIG MAGIC by Elizabeth Gilbert
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Not earth shattering but warmly inspirational."
The bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love reflects on what it means to pursue a creative life.Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A lively, balanced re-examination of the traditional mind-body issue in light of modern advances in neuroscience."
"We do not have bodies, we are bodies," writes Claxton (Emeritus, Learning Sciences/Univ. of Winchester; The Wayward Mind: An Intimate History of the Unconscious, 2005, etc.) in this challenge to the contemporary view of what it means to be intelligent. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Strong medical research and firsthand accounts provide evidence that playing games can make you a healthier, happier, more confident person."
New strategies to create a great life through the power of games. Read full book review >
THIRTY MILLION WORDS by Dana Suskind
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Informative, exciting new data that confirms the significant benefits gained by talking to your child."
New research demonstrating the importance of communicating with your child right from birth. Read full book review >
Depression Delusion Volume One by Terry Lynch
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 2, 2015

"An eye-opening look at how a singular theory of depression has pervaded and persuaded the medical world."
In this first of three planned volumes, an Irish doctor and psychotherapist discusses the lack of scientific evidence for a long-held, widespread theory of depression. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The Bennetts administer a highly informative and entertaining smack down to get your head on straight."
Psychiatrist Michael Bennett and his comedy-writer daughter, Sarah, combine to demonstrate "why self-improvement is hard and sometimes impossible, even when we're strong-willed and well guided." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >