Psychology Book Reviews

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2015

"To be read as both corrective and supplement to Foucault, Szasz, and Rieff. Often brilliant and always luminous and rewarding."
Far-ranging, illuminating study of minds gone awry across space and time. Read full book review >
SHRINKS by Jeffrey A. Lieberman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Vastly edifying and vigorously written—a much-needed update on how far the psychiatric industry has come, both medically and from a public perception standpoint."
An intelligent, encouraging survey of the psychiatric industry. Read full book review >

THE MAN WHO COULDN'T STOP by David Adam
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Well-researched, witty, honest and irreverent, Adam's account proves as irresistible as his subject."
An engrossing first-person study of obsessive-compulsive disorder from within and without. Read full book review >
THE RESILIENCE DIVIDEND by Judith Rodin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A convincing argument that becoming resilient is not only possible, but essential; food for thought for all and especially recommended for community leaders."
A revealing examination of the anatomy of resilience, the capacity to withstand and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. Read full book review >
STRUCK BY GENIUS by Jason Padgett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 22, 2014

"An exquisite insider's look into the mysteries of consciousness."
When Padgett suffered a traumatic brain injury after a violent mugging, his sense of perception was profoundly altered. Overnight, his life as a fun-loving salesman changed into one dominated by unprompted geometric visualizations and the unexpected insights of newfound mathematical brilliance. Read full book review >

THE BROKEN AND THE WHOLE by Charles S. Sherman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 2014

"Deeply moving, extraordinarily thought-provoking and entirely humane."
A meaningful portrayal of how tragedy affected and transformed one family and especially one religious leader. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2014

"Powerful, eye-opening and funny. Pitch-perfect in his storytelling, Stossel reminds us that, in many important ways, to be anxious is to be human."
In this captivating and intimate book, the editor of the Atlantic spares no detail about his lifelong struggle with anxiety and contextualizes his personal experience within the history of anxiety's perception and treatment. Read full book review >
LAMENT OF THE DEAD by James Hillman
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 26, 2013

"A brilliant collection, evocative of all that is wonderful and strange about Jung's Red Book and about the human psyche itself."
This series of transcribed conversations between two eminent scholars provides nuanced and provocative context for Carl Jung's Red Book and its influence on contemporary thinking. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 22, 2013

"An important book by a refreshingly candid author who shares his vast knowledge in the interests of the needy."
Psychiatrist Torrey (The Insanity Offense: How America's Failure to Treat the Seriously Mentally Ill Endangers Its Citizens, 2008, etc.) returns to the battleground of reform with another book about the inability of government agencies and private institutions to care well for the severely mentally ill. Read full book review >
THINKING IN NUMBERS by Daniel Tammet
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 30, 2013

"Great fun and the perfect gift for any math-phobic person, young or old."
A mathematical savant finds the beauty of numbers in unexpected places. Read full book review >
TOUCHING A NERVE by Patricia Churchland
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 22, 2013

"Wide-ranging, insightful and provocative—a book to savor."
Churchland (Emeritus, Philosophy/Univ. of California, San Diego; Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality, 2011, etc.) probes the interface between our perception of our own mental processes and our growing knowledge of how our brains function. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 11, 2013

"A thoroughly enjoyable exploration of questions even astute readers may not have thought worth asking."
A wise old psychologist collects a lifetime of neurological pearls. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >