Psychology Book Reviews

COOL by Steven Quartz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 14, 2015

"Some points are more provocative than convincing, but the authors put a lively spin on an age-old argument."
A counterintuitive analysis suggesting that consumers instinctively know more about the value of the signals they are sending than their critics do. Read full book review >
THE SKELETON CUPBOARD by Tanya Byron
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"A lucid and compassionate memoir."
A British mental health practitioner and media personality's absorbing account of the years she spent as a clinical psychologist-in-training. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2015

"To be read as both corrective and supplement to Foucault, Szasz, and Rieff. Often brilliant and always luminous and rewarding."
Far-ranging, illuminating study of minds gone awry across space and time. Read full book review >
SHRINKS by Jeffrey A. Lieberman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Vastly edifying and vigorously written—a much-needed update on how far the psychiatric industry has come, both medically and from a public perception standpoint."
An intelligent, encouraging survey of the psychiatric industry. Read full book review >
I AM NOT A SLUT by Leora Tanenbaum
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A significant, spirited analysis sure to be embraced by feminists and deserving of wide attention."
An enthusiastic update on the state of female sexual liberation in contemporary society. Read full book review >

THE EVIL HOURS by David J. Morris
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"An eye-opening investigation of war's casualties."
An exploration of the enduring human cost of war. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO COULDN'T STOP by David Adam
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"Well-researched, witty, honest and irreverent, Adam's account proves as irresistible as his subject."
An engrossing first-person study of obsessive-compulsive disorder from within and without. Read full book review >
FEELING SMART by Eyal Winter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"No special knowledge of game theory or of economic theory is required to follow Winter's arguments, and his insights about human behavior range over a variety of areas: politics, religion, sex, marriage and art. A lively, accessible work."
A Humboldt Prize-winning Israeli scholar of behavioral economics advances the concept of rational emotions in a book filled with fascinating studies and personal anecdotes. Read full book review >
WHAT DO I DO NOW? by Stephen D. Miller
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Dec. 10, 2014

"An intellectual but nontechnical concept of human psychological development that offers useful prescriptions for self-improvement."
Miller's debutnonfiction book asks a question that's easy for readers to lose sight of amidst the hurdles of daily living: am I living a meaningful life? Read full book review >
THE RESILIENCE DIVIDEND by Judith Rodin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A convincing argument that becoming resilient is not only possible, but essential; food for thought for all and especially recommended for community leaders."
A revealing examination of the anatomy of resilience, the capacity to withstand and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Entertaining, enlightening and refreshingly light on psychobabble."
A researcher who is both a scholar and an experienced motivational speaker makes the subject of personality psychology come to life. Read full book review >
THE MARSHMALLOW TEST by Walter Mischel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"No one will deny that self-control would make for a better planet, and this cogent guide suggests paths that may lead us to more conscious control of this desirable quality."
Mischel (Psychology/Columbia Univ.) argues that our ability to voluntarily exercise self-restraint in pursuit of that just-got-to-have-it desire provides children with a powerful tool that can help them succeed later in life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >