Psychology Book Reviews

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 19, 2016

"A successful and detailed guide to using mindfulness to heal and redirect negative emotions."
In this self-improvement title, Heitler (The Power of Two Workbook: Communication Skills for A Strong & Loving Marriage, 2003, etc.) explores several major psychological problems, including anger, fear, anxiety, and addictive behaviors. Read full book review >
THE VOYEUR'S MOTEL by Gay Talese
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2016

"Undoubtedly creepy and unnerving but also an entirely compelling slice of seamy American life."
The disturbing private world of the sleaziest motel manager since Norman Bates. Read full book review >

TRISTIMANIA by Jay Griffiths
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Fortunately for everyone who has been affected by bipolar disorder, Griffiths—and her notebooks—survived the journey."
A visceral account of the turmoil experienced within a manic-depressive breakdown. Read full book review >
BUT WHAT IF WE'RE WRONG? by Chuck Klosterman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Replete with lots of nifty, whimsical footnotes, this clever, speculative book challenges our beliefs with jocularity and perspicacity."
An inquiry into why we'll probably be wrong about almost everything. Read full book review >
ORDINARILY WELL by Peter D. Kramer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Written with the compassion, verve, and style that are the author's trademark, this book offers an invaluable overview on the state of treatment and the options available."
The 1993 publication of Kramer's Listening to Prozac set off a controversy about the use of mind-altering drugs in the treatment of mental illness that has still to be resolved, a situation the author finds deplorable. Read full book review >

CHANCERS by Susan Stellin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"An emotionally complex and intensely personal binary memoir of addiction and sustainable love."
The unconventional love story between an emerging author and the troubled man she discovers to be a hard-core drug addict. Read full book review >
STRANGER IN THE MIRROR by Robert V. Levine
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2016

"A provocative and convincing case of the malleability of what we think of as 'our self, which in reality is a multiplicity of characters' developed through time and circumstances."
A multiangled exploration of the slippery notion of self-identity. Read full book review >
READING AND WRITING CANCER by Susan Gubar
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal."
For cancer sufferers, words can lift the spirit. Read full book review >
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE by Tom Vanderbilt
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 10, 2016

"Like it or not, there's much to behold in this exhaustively researched, intellectual assessment of human preference."
The science behind the choices we make. Read full book review >
Erotic Integrity by Claudia Six
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 10, 2016

"A bold, refreshing call to discover and own one's sexuality."
A debut self-help book that aims to help individuals and couples work through their sexual fears. Read full book review >
THE FIRST 1,000 DAYS by Roger Thurow
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 3, 2016

"In-depth research and personal stories bring the issue of malnutrition in women and children to the forefront and provide evidence that, with proper support, children can flourish."
A presentation of research from around the world showing that good nutrition is critical in the first 1,000 days of a child's life. Read full book review >
GRIT by Angela Duckworth
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Not your grandpa's self-help book, but Duckworth's text is oddly encouraging, exhorting us to do better by trying harder, and a pleasure to read."
Gumption: it's not just for readers of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, as this debut book, blending anecdote and science, statistic and yarn, capably illustrates.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >