Psychology Book Reviews

THE FIRST 1,000 DAYS by Roger Thurow
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 3, 2016

"In-depth research and personal stories bring the issue of malnutrition in women and children to the forefront and provide evidence that, with proper support, children can flourish."
A presentation of research from around the world showing that good nutrition is critical in the first 1,000 days of a child's life. Read full book review >
GRIT by Angela Duckworth
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Not your grandpa's self-help book, but Duckworth's text is oddly encouraging, exhorting us to do better by trying harder, and a pleasure to read."
Gumption: it's not just for readers of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, as this debut book, blending anecdote and science, statistic and yarn, capably illustrates.Read full book review >

PINPOINT by Greg Milner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 3, 2016

"Milner has done his homework, assuring readers will be satisfied, educated, and occasionally amazed."
What universal digital service is essential to the world's infrastructure and our daily lives? Yes, the Internet, but more fundamentally, the Global Positioning System. Read full book review >
VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >
ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY by Brian Christian
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"An entertaining, intelligently presented book for the numerate and computer literate."
We are always connected: this is both our blessing and our curse. The problem "is that we're always buffered," just a step behind the flood of information flowing toward and past us, all the books and movies and other ingredients of what the authors call "bufferbloat."Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A challenging and provocative inquiry into how we see the world…now, 'the point is to change it.'"
A semiotics for the masses. Read full book review >
NOTHING EVER DIES by Viet Thanh Nguyen
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Essentially a critical study, Nguyen's work is a powerful reflection on how we choose to remember and forget."
A scholarly exploration of memory and the Vietnam War from an author "born in Vietnam but made in America." Read full book review >
UNBROKEN BRAIN by Maia Szalavitz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A dense blending of self-exposure, surprising statistics, and solid science reporting that presents addiction as a misunderstood coping mechanism, a problem whose true nature is not yet recognized by policymakers or the public."
A proposal for a new way of looking at drug addiction that offers a fresh approach to managing it. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >
SWITCHED ON by John Elder Robison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A fascinating companion to the previous memoirs by this masterful storyteller."
The bestselling author shares his experience as a participant in a cutting-edge study of the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brains of people on the autism spectrum. Read full book review >
SMARTER FASTER BETTER by Charles Duhigg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Highly informative and entertaining and certain to have wide appeal."
Why some people are more productive than others. Read full book review >
THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Although art may be generated by loneliness, writes Laing in this illuminating, enriching book, it has a significant 'capacity to create intimacy.'"
A British journalist and cultural critic investigates how loneliness shapes art. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >