PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"It's no match for Jesse Sheidlower's fluent, fun The F Word (1995), but Bergen's study is still a winner for the psycholinguistics nerd in the house."
An examination of the sub rosa language that sets us all atwitter—and athwart. Read full book review >
A Psychological Perspective on Joy and Emotional Fulfillment by Chris M. Meadows
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"An enlightening read for anyone who wants to learn more about joy and related emotions."
In this debut nonfiction work, an academic, clinical psychologist, and psychotherapist reviews the scholarship on joy and attempts to define what it is and how it comes about. Read full book review >

LONE WOLF TERRORISM by Jeffrey D. Simon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Some of Simon's research validates common-sense conclusions about extreme human behavior, but the book contains enough fresh findings to recommend it to those who want to delve into such dark corners."
In the second edition of his book originally published in 2013, Simon (The Terrorist Trap: America's Experience with Terrorism, 1994, etc.) focuses his scholarship on spree killers who act alone or with minimal assistance. Read full book review >
A FIELD GUIDE TO LIES by Daniel J. Levitin
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Valuable tools for anyone willing to evaluate claims and get to the truth of the matter."
A crash course in Skepticism 101. Read full book review >
THE FOUR-DIMENSIONAL HUMAN by Laurence Scott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"More Adorno than Negroponte but of interest to students of contemporary first-world culture."
Is Airbnb the beginning of our end? Perhaps not, but, as this elegant meditation explores, it's just one more sign of our sterile, disembodied times. Read full book review >

PATIENT H.M. by Luke Dittrich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A mesmerizing, maddening story and a model of journalistic investigation."
Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King in a piercing study of one of psychiatric medicine's darker hours. Read full book review >
THE VOYEUR'S MOTEL by Gay Talese
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2016

"Undoubtedly creepy and unnerving but also an entirely compelling slice of seamy American life."
The disturbing private world of the sleaziest motel manager since Norman Bates. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Insightful, encouraging, and universally practical."
A New York Times business reporter shares her wisdom on creating and completing that elusive back-burner dream project. Read full book review >
THE SELFISHNESS OF OTHERS by Kristin Dombek
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A savvy, sharp study that only occasionally loses readers in the psychological brambles."
A personal and clinical deconstruction of the narcissistic personality. Read full book review >
MY SON WEARS HEELS by Julie Tarney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A fearlessly open and frank memoir."
The mother of a gender creative child reflects on the unique path of his development from childhood to adulthood. Read full book review >
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY by John Kaag
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Kaag's lively prose, acute self-examination, unfolding romance, and instructive history of philosophy as a discipline make for a surprisingly absorbing book."
A compelling hybrid combining memoir, a dramatic narrative about saving an endangered rare book collection, and the intellectual history of philosophy. Read full book review >
WAKING THE SPIRIT by Andrew Schulman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"An inspirational testament to the limitless benefits of music and its role in health care."
A near-death survivor and career musician demonstrates the true healing power of music. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >