Your Faithful Brain: Designed for So Much More! by Leonard Matheson
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 1, 2014

"A well-presented religious study of the brain."
A debut treatise about finding greater mental health through spiritual renewal. Read full book review >
THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Although art may be generated by loneliness, writes Laing in this illuminating, enriching book, it has a significant 'capacity to create intimacy.'"
A British journalist and cultural critic investigates how loneliness shapes art. Read full book review >

AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
THE GRAY RHINO by Michele Wucker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A valuable guide for individuals and policymakers who want to act when they see the lights of an oncoming train."
An analysis of "highly obvious but ignored threats"—from failing infrastructure to financial crises to climate change—and what can be done to prevent disastrous outcomes. Read full book review >
JUNK by Alison Stewart
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 2016

"Absorbing and enjoyably compelling research on the packrat conundrum in our society."
Quirky, immersive report on the "who, what, where, when, and why of junk." Read full book review >

ON BEING RAPED by Raymond M. Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Courageous, sobering, and cathartic."
A searing, self-reflective account of adult male rape. Read full book review >
UNBROKEN BRAIN by Maia Szalavitz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A dense blending of self-exposure, surprising statistics, and solid science reporting that presents addiction as a misunderstood coping mechanism, a problem whose true nature is not yet recognized by policymakers or the public."
A proposal for a new way of looking at drug addiction that offers a fresh approach to managing it. Read full book review >
ON BEING HUMAN by Jerome Kagan
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 22, 2016

"'Nature is obsessed with particularities,' writes Kagan. A particularly fruitful book for students of the mind."
Nature or nurture? The answer, writes Kagan (The Human Spark: The Science of Human Development, 2013, etc.), eminent Harvard emeritus professor of psychology, is yes.Read full book review >
SOAR ABOVE by Steven Stosny
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 5, 2016

"In a book that will appeal to readers devoted to self-betterment, a relationship expert divides the brain into two parts and shows how to let the mature side win when under stress."
How to access your higher brain for a better life. Read full book review >
BECOMING WISE by Krista Tippett
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A hopeful consideration of the human potential for enlightenment."
Five key words serve as guideposts in a search for wisdom. Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
Out of Numbness by C. A. Wyatt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2015

"A revealing, sometimes-moving story of an Everydruggie."
A young engineer spirals downward into drugs, then 12-steps his way back in this dogged dysfunctionality narrative. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >