Psychology Book Reviews

BUT WHAT IF WE'RE WRONG? by Chuck Klosterman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Replete with lots of nifty, whimsical footnotes, this clever, speculative book challenges our beliefs with jocularity and perspicacity."
An inquiry into why we'll probably be wrong about almost everything. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >

SMARTER FASTER BETTER by Charles Duhigg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Highly informative and entertaining and certain to have wide appeal."
Why some people are more productive than others. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An academic yet concise, fresh, and deeply informed look at how we read."
How does the study of disability help us to understand stories? Read full book review >
WHILE THE CITY SLEPT by Eli Sanders
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An exceptional story of compelling interest in a time of school shootings, ethnic and class strife, and other unbound expressions of madness and illness."
Disturbing, sometimes-horrifying story of true crime and justice only partially served. Read full book review >

INVENTOLOGY by Pagan Kennedy
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"A delightful account of how inventors do what they do."
A journalist delivers an enthusiastic overview of inventions and the researchers that study them. Read full book review >
THE CONFIDENCE GAME by Maria Konnikova
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"With meticulous research and a facility for storytelling, Konnikova makes this intriguing topic absolutely riveting."
What makes a con artist, and why are we duped by them? New Yorker columnist Konnikova (Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, 2013) takes us deeply into the art and psychology of the con game.Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The Bennetts administer a highly informative and entertaining smack down to get your head on straight."
Psychiatrist Michael Bennett and his comedy-writer daughter, Sarah, combine to demonstrate "why self-improvement is hard and sometimes impossible, even when we're strong-willed and well guided." Read full book review >
BLACKOUT by Sarah Hepola
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2015

"A treasure trove of hard truths mined from a life soaked in booze."
A razor-sharp memoir that reveals the woman behind the wine glass. Read full book review >
HEAD CASE by Cole Cohen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 19, 2015

"A beautifully wrenching memoir as piercing as smelling salts."
The story of a woman with a hole in her brain the size of a lemon. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2015

"To be read as both corrective and supplement to Foucault, Szasz, and Rieff. Often brilliant and always luminous and rewarding."
Far-ranging, illuminating study of minds gone awry across space and time. Read full book review >
SHRINKS by Jeffrey A. Lieberman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Vastly edifying and vigorously written—a much-needed update on how far the psychiatric industry has come, both medically and from a public perception standpoint."
An intelligent, encouraging survey of the psychiatric industry. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >