Psychology Book Reviews

WHEN THE SUN BURSTS by Christopher Bollas
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A vastly informative, coherent, and valuable assessment; useful and accessible for both mental health professionals and laypeople—even those who don't share the author's unique perspectives and treatment alternatives."
A contemporary appraisal of schizophrenia and its puzzling traits and treatments through the lens of a physician's esteemed 40-year practice. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Unique, well-curated brain food for readers intrigued with the human psyche and how it can be recorded, indexed, and cross-referenced."
A detailed exploration of a historic, one-of-a-kind social archive project. Read full book review >

THE ART OF GRACE by Sarah L. Kaufman
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"An insightful, intelligent examination of grace, which often 'seems to elude fixed meaning.'"
Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post dance critic Kaufman reflects on the meaning of grace in modern society.Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A fun, successful collection of concepts, thoughts, and strategies about maintaining joy and living creatively."
Debut author and educational administrator Popish offers innovative springboards, exercises, and tools for a more inspired life. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Gay's observations about his stumbles through life, and the little victories that come from learning from those stumbles, make for a rollicking good read."
Instructive essays in a comedic vein. Read full book review >

SOUL MACHINE by George Makari
Released: Oct. 19, 2015

"An erudite book that reveals how and why the understanding of consciousness still eludes us."
Throughout Western history, the nature of humans' inner lives has vexed philosophers, physicians, scientists, and theologians. Makari (Psychiatry/Weill Cornell Medical Coll.; Revolution in Mind: The Creation of Psychoanalysis, 2008) offers a thorough examination of debates about soul, spirit, and what we now call "mind." Read full book review >
NONSENSE by Jamie Holmes
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"The author's bright anecdotes and wide-ranging research stories are certain to please many readers."
New America Foundation Future Tense fellow Holmes, a former research coordinator in the department of economics at Harvard, debuts with a provocative analysis of the roots of uncertainty. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A provocative challenge to the tendency to elevate ideology over thoughtfulness. The author amply shows how 'stability is blissful, but it may also be illusory, hiding the buildup of hidden risks or nurturing behavior that will bring the stability to an end.'"
Societies and economies "are not inherently stable," writes Wall Street Journal chief economics commentator Ip (The Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World, 2010) in this eye-opening book about risk-taking and crisis.Read full book review >
Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An often masterful hybrid of self-help and firsthand history."
Haas (Dakini Power, 2013) offers a combination of science reportage, memoir, and advice on the subject of trauma.Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Fascinating and terrifying portraits of saints and ministers of grace."
A New Yorker staff writer delves into the strange lives and curious mindsets of extreme altruists. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"In clear, accessible, and upbeat prose, Ingram demonstrates his optimism about the possibility of aging with an agile mind, and he is hopeful about finding an effective treatment for sufferers."
What science has learned about the brain, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A firm response to currently accepted dog-training methods."
A convincing guide for dog owners as well as a memoir of instructive adventures set in nature. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >