JOURNEY WITH STRANGERS by R. C. Hutchinson

JOURNEY WITH STRANGERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A strange journey, this ""Journey with Strangers"", as Stefanie, a waif brought up in the Kolbeck household, married and deserted by one Kolbeck son, married a second time to another non, Victor, tells the story. The time is after the Germans and Russians had again dismembered tragic Poland- in 1939. The Kolbecks, high born, living for the Poland they dreamed existed, refused to accept the inevitable future, clung to old traditions, felt that in their country estate lay security, for all their own, including Stefanie and the unborn son of Victor. Colonel Julius, Stefanie's father-in-law, exacted her promise that the baby be brought up in the Kolbeck tradition. And in the grim months ahead, the irony of that promise highlights the events. The Germans move in, the family is confined to crowded quarters, forced to heavy labor, to loss of dignity, to fear. Then the Russians come- and the family is thrust forth, sent to a concentration camp. The baby is born on the way. Some die- some go mad. The journey continues. Another camp. Other violences and indignities. But somehow the Kolbecks survive, and Stefanie, having learned the secret of her own identity, betrayed Julius, lost her baby, found the husband she thought dead- in the end stands again alone. A grim tale of an era that Europe knows too well- that to us seems very remote. This story brings it closer, but makes dreary reading.

Publisher: Rinehart