AMERICAN EDUCATION IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT by R. Freeman Butts

AMERICAN EDUCATION IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In this much-expanded version of his recent John Dewey Society Lecture, Professor Butts has taken as his subject the three stages of U.S. ""educational involvement with other nations since World War II"". As he sees them, these stages are: simple exchange of knowledge; provision by us to other countries of technical assistance and advice in education; and the supplying of ""large numbers of Americans who will become regular teachers"" abroad. It is this last stage, scarcely three years old, to which he devotes most thought, because it has not yet had any serious attention given it in the public press. As director of International Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University, and of the Teachers for East Africa Program, Professor Butts is very well qualified, and he writes not only with authoritative humility, but also with cogency and skill. All the foreign aid in money and materials delivered to emerging nations is worthless without trained people there who can use it; and likewise, the transition from a primitive society to a modern, democratic one is primarily dependent upon education. This slim book raises many large questions and indicates the proper approach to not a few of them. One can only hope it obtains the audience it deserves.

Pub Date: Dec. 18th, 1963
Publisher: Harper & Row