WHAT DOES A GEOLOGIST DO? by R. V. Fodor

WHAT DOES A GEOLOGIST DO?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Noting that the classical field geologist has been replaced by ""specialized"" and ""technical"" geologists (and, incidentally, that four years of college is ""really not enough"" preparation), Fodor surveys different members of his profession at their work: there is a trio drilling the ocean floor from the Glomar Challenger, a scubadiving sedimentologist, and less spectacular others who age-date rocks, conduct seismic surveys, determine stresses for construction projects, and so on. Fodor points out that many geologists start out exploring for oil or minerals for private companies, and that though most jobs offer travel opportunity much of the work is now done in the laboratory. Without the trappings of salary schedules, course requirements, etc., this is not the usual career book, and with only incidental attention to plate techtonics, rock formation, and the like it's hardly a science book; but Fodor's natural manner, broad familiarity, and integrated examples establish a more valid claim to the territory in between than did Berger's console-oriented views of Scientists at Work.

Pub Date: Jan. 16th, 1978
Publisher: Dodd, Mead