THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD by Ralph Martin

THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Let the squeamish beware of this one for no detail of battle horror is spared. But for these who can face facts, and are in sympathy with a desire to make order out of post-war chaos, Martin has written a series of hard-hitting sketches about the current life scene that will prove most appealing, until constant repetition of effect becomes monotonous. The present scene is his theme, pointing up the disappointments of the post war world to the veteran in housing, racial bias, economics. A short description of some phase of military life during the war introduces each sketch, interwoven with dreams of the boys contrasted with incidents in actual post war -- living for the returned vet, emphasizing the difference between hope and reality. There are some heartening aspects as the action of the vets in the Athens, Tennessee, election uprisings, when a corrupt regime is driven out in bloody battle; and again in the election of a young vet in New Orleans. But- he reiterates- ""If this action is only a flash in the pan, it will be wasted effort"". There's too much sameness, and even though forceful, the book tends to lose its punch. But many veterans will read it with recognition of its authenticity and perhaps it will make some dent on the public.

Pub Date: Feb. 21st, 1947
Publisher: Farrar, Straus