THE OLD TRAILS OF THE WEST by Ralph Moody

THE OLD TRAILS OF THE WEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

r. Moody has an ability to present facts straightforwardly while allowing the reader to slip off into irresistible reflections of his own. This story of animal and human intelligence creating trail patterns on the face of the West blends onder with resourcefulness. Over a million years ago horses no longer than grey-ounds originated on the central plains and traveled to the tip of South America and to the Arctic Circle. These migrations were the first trailblazings. The trail ong the Gila River gives evidence of human life in 1300 B.C. But it wasn't until the Conquistadors set out up the Gila Trail to locate the fabled Seven Cities of Cibola that the West was opened. Indian trails, missionary trails, wagon and ony Express trails form the bulk of Mr. Moody's concern, along with the effects of the Gold Rush. Most of these trails vanished shortly after the Union Pacific prove in its golden spike connecting the two coasts. Journeywork but interesting. alf the material itself duplicates Todd Webb's more personal travelogue later in this issue.

Publisher: Crowell