A revealing, heart-wrenching account about special needs adoption, the grave implications of prenatal and early childhood...

DOORWAY TO HEARTBREAK PATH TO HOPE

...OUR ADOPTION JOURNEY

Harper’s intimate memoir of one family’s special needs adoption journey.

Harper (I Choose to Fight, 1984), the family’s father, candidly reflects on his family’s horrific yet beautiful journey in this compelling, but sometimes difficult, account. Many times, it seems he and his wife, Rose, and their three typically developing biological children will collapse under the strain of providing for two traumatized adopted children while preserving their own personal safety and sanity. When it seems nothing else terrible can happen, it does, and the parents, particularly the mother, come through. The Harpers respond to a plethora of diagnoses: fetal alcohol effects, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, Tourette’s syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia. These conditions require changing medications and multiple therapies, while navigating formidable bureaucracies to secure proper care for their children. Harper outlines the adoptees’ entire biological family background and the state foster care/adoption system without assessing blame, but he finally admits that he “had trouble accepting the responsibility.” When faced with institutionalizing their 12-year-old son, Harper notes that nobody told them about the severity of the child’s disabilities. The author’s honesty throughout the book, especially at his lowest points, garners the reader’s sympathy and respect. His conversational style works well when tackling such difficult subjects, including the adoptees’ sexual and substance abuse and their mental health diagnoses and treatment. Though his authority is hard to question, it’s somewhat lessened by a few typos that crop up throughout.

A revealing, heart-wrenching account about special needs adoption, the grave implications of prenatal and early childhood trauma, and the resilience of truly tough love and hope.

Pub Date: Aug. 3, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 501

Publisher: Publish Green

Review Posted Online: Jan. 16, 2013

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Striking research showing the immense complexity of ordinary thought and revealing the identities of the gatekeepers in our...

THINKING, FAST AND SLOW

A psychologist and Nobel Prize winner summarizes and synthesizes the recent decades of research on intuition and systematic thinking.

The author of several scholarly texts, Kahneman (Emeritus Psychology and Public Affairs/Princeton Univ.) now offers general readers not just the findings of psychological research but also a better understanding of how research questions arise and how scholars systematically frame and answer them. He begins with the distinction between System 1 and System 2 mental operations, the former referring to quick, automatic thought, the latter to more effortful, overt thinking. We rely heavily, writes, on System 1, resorting to the higher-energy System 2 only when we need or want to. Kahneman continually refers to System 2 as “lazy”: We don’t want to think rigorously about something. The author then explores the nuances of our two-system minds, showing how they perform in various situations. Psychological experiments have repeatedly revealed that our intuitions are generally wrong, that our assessments are based on biases and that our System 1 hates doubt and despises ambiguity. Kahneman largely avoids jargon; when he does use some (“heuristics,” for example), he argues that such terms really ought to join our everyday vocabulary. He reviews many fundamental concepts in psychology and statistics (regression to the mean, the narrative fallacy, the optimistic bias), showing how they relate to his overall concerns about how we think and why we make the decisions that we do. Some of the later chapters (dealing with risk-taking and statistics and probabilities) are denser than others (some readers may resent such demands on System 2!), but the passages that deal with the economic and political implications of the research are gripping.

Striking research showing the immense complexity of ordinary thought and revealing the identities of the gatekeepers in our minds.

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-374-27563-1

Page Count: 512

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: Sept. 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2011

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IN COLD BLOOD

"There's got to be something wrong with somebody who'd do a thing like that." This is Perry Edward Smith, talking about himself. "Deal me out, baby...I'm a normal." This is Richard Eugene Hickock, talking about himself. They're as sick a pair as Leopold and Loeb and together they killed a mother, a father, a pretty 17-year-old and her brother, none of whom they'd seen before, in cold blood. A couple of days before they had bought a 100 foot rope to garrote them—enough for ten people if necessary. This small pogrom took place in Holcomb, Kansas, a lonesome town on a flat, limitless landscape: a depot, a store, a cafe, two filling stations, 270 inhabitants. The natives refer to it as "out there." It occurred in 1959 and Capote has spent five years, almost all of the time which has since elapsed, in following up this crime which made no sense, had no motive, left few clues—just a footprint and a remembered conversation. Capote's alternating dossier Shifts from the victims, the Clutter family, to the boy who had loved Nancy Clutter, and her best friend, to the neighbors, and to the recently paroled perpetrators: Perry, with a stunted child's legs and a changeling's face, and Dick, who had one squinting eye but a "smile that works." They had been cellmates at the Kansas State Penitentiary where another prisoner had told them about the Clutters—he'd hired out once on Mr. Clutter's farm and thought that Mr. Clutter was perhaps rich. And this is the lead which finally broke the case after Perry and Dick had drifted down to Mexico, back to the midwest, been seen in Kansas City, and were finally picked up in Las Vegas. The last, even more terrible chapters, deal with their confessions, the law man who wanted to see them hanged, back to back, the trial begun in 1960, the post-ponements of the execution, and finally the walk to "The Corner" and Perry's soft-spoken words—"It would be meaningless to apologize for what I did. Even inappropriate. But I do. I apologize." It's a magnificent job—this American tragedy—with the incomparable Capote touches throughout. There may never have been a perfect crime, but if there ever has been a perfect reconstruction of one, surely this must be it.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 1965

ISBN: 0375507906

Page Count: 343

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 10, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1965

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