GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER by Raokhan Holt

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The career and character of one of the finest ambassadors of racial goodwill, teacher, scientist, gifted Negro, whose recent death makes this a timely book in the news. From the Missouri woods to international fame, and all the steps between are recounted with affection and genuine appreciation. As a child he was nicknamed a ""plant doctor""; his many talents sent him into far places, until at last he entered a college not closed to Negroes. He shifted from art to agriculture, and taught later in Iowa State Agricultural University. Then he went to Tuskegee, where under Booker T. Washington he was allowed all freedom in his experimentation. From his laboratory came evolutionary discoveries of saving waste, turning things to new uses (peanuts, sweet potations, beans were among the things he worked with), making great contributions to the new science of chemurgy, and giving practical aid to his neighbors, black and white. A thinker, rather than a fighter, capable when problems of color across, a scientist rather than a sociologist, he was not only a great man of his race, but of all mankind.

Pub Date: April 2nd, 1943
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran