BLOOD, OIL AND SAND by Ray Brock

BLOOD, OIL AND SAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This New York Times correspondent draws from his long experience, the most recent being that of the summer and fall of 1951, to ""lay it on the line"" about the crucial crucible of the Middle East. The core of his survey is the conflict between the United States and Russia, which he feels will inevitably wax hot. To the Middle East, with its tempting wealth in oil, the United States offers aid in defeating Communism, hunger, disease, and poverty; Soviet Russia offers aid in overthrowing despotic rulers, evicting in-fidels from the West, and gaining national freedom. Brock warns the West how sweet the Soviet song in to many sons of Islam. He reports vital facts about Turkey, Greece, Syria, the Lebanon, Israel Jordan, Iraq, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, giving penetrating views into the overt and latent strengths and weaknesses -- overwhelming -- of the countries, indicating their reaction to the West and Communism, their vulnerability to the latter. He goes on to discuss the periphery of the Middle East -- the Baltic nations, Libya, Sudan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, etc.. Brock offers a program of action for the West in its dealings with this scathing section of the world. He covers a lot of territory -- too much to be thorough. His reporting is incisive, racy, and hurried. His ideas will rouse comment, and his book will serve to bring more consideration to an area of the world that severely demands our keen attention.

Pub Date: April 15th, 1952
Publisher: World