IN THE LAND OF JIM CROW by Ray Sprigle
Kirkus Star

IN THE LAND OF JIM CROW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This repeat performance on the stratagem of Gentleman's Agreement by a Pittsburgh newspaperman who decided to ""pass"" as a Negro for a month won him a Pulitzer Prize- and this report, of what it feels like to be a Negro in the land of Jim Crow, has a simple and direct target value beyond that of more serious, sociological studies. Traveling through the worst states, Georgia, Mississippi and Alabama, covering over 40,000 miles, Sprigle got the full proof that where ""Discrimination against the Negro in the North is an annoyance and an injustice. In the South it is a bloodstained tragedy."" Here, in short sequences, you will learn what life is like below what the Negro calls the Smith & Wesson line; about sharecropping- grand larceny on a grand scale; about the right to vote the dark man cannot get; about ""white hospitals and black deaths""; about Jim Crow justice and Jim Crow schools; about lynching- and the Monroe (Georgia) massacre; and of what it feels like to live in the constant shadow of fear and suspicion and without recourse. A protest which is never bitter, and which cannot fail in its appeal to personal as well as democratic decency.

Pub Date: May 9th, 1949
Publisher: Simon & Schuster