CIVILIANS MUST FIGHT by Raymond Daniell

CIVILIANS MUST FIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

At the start this seems to be just another American foreign correspondent's story. As it gathers momentum, it acquires a definite personality all its own, as a warm personal record of the spirit of the English people under fire, through the experiences of the top man in the N. Y. Times London Office. It is the civilians' story he tells, fighting the war day and night, at their machines, at the docks, in their offices, their flats. The story has been told, but Daniell catches certain lights and shadows that give it new depths -- he writes without heroics, in simple and revealing fashion; he nses the great underlying changes that are permeating society and building themselves into civilian defense. Once again, evidence that our foreign correspondents are our best diplomats; they see what is happening down the line; they tell their stories ""without fear or favor"". Daniell makes the reader feel present with him, sharing each phase of his experience. A good addition to our correspondents' shelf, though not as stirring as Ghirer or Stowe.

Pub Date: Nov. 7th, 1941
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran