SARTRE: THE THEOLOGY OF THE ABSURD by Regis Jolivet

SARTRE: THE THEOLOGY OF THE ABSURD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The name of Jean-Paul Sartre is inextricably associated with two phenomena of modern times: existentialism and atheism. It is typical of Sartre's subtly but paradoxically constructed system of existential atheism that it is possible to extricate from it an essential theology based upon the philosopher's conviction that the fundamental philosophical revolt should be against a belief in God which transfers human anxiety to the abstract and therefore fictitious level. Jolivet applies himself to the task of delineating that ""theology of the absurd"" with a good deal of perspicacity and skill, and not without some sympathy for his subject. The somewhat elaborate scholarly apparatus seems almost out of place in this well written, good-humored book which manages somehow to retain even the non-philosopher's interest in discussing as recondite a subject as the ontological thought of Sartre. One would, however, indeed be skirting the frontier of the absurd in hoping that this skillfully conceived and thoroughly sound study should somehow find its way into the field of interest of the general reader. Its audience sill be the student and the professional; and, even in that Category, the book will be of particular interest only to those who are concerned more with Sartre's atheism than with his existentialism.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1967
Publisher: Newman