DNA of Mathematics by Mehran Basti
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"Despite occasional nuggets of intrigue, wildly uneven and simply too disorganized to hold much interest or credibility."
Debut author Basti, a mathematician, explains the wide-ranging significance of Riccati differential equations frequently used in studies of motion in physics and engineering. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 20, 2015

"Refreshingly nonpolemical—will be of special interest to secular parents struggling with some of the issues presented."
To Sunday school or not to Sunday school? Read full book review >

BATTLING THE GODS by Tim Whitmarsh
Released: Nov. 13, 2015

"Though not for those seeking a light read, this is a seminal work on the subject, to be studied, reread, and referenced."
Whitmarsh (Greek Culture/Univ. of Cambridge; Beyond the Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism, 2013, etc.) explores the evolution of atheism from Homer to the Roman Empire.Read full book review >
THE 613 by Archie Rand
Kirkus Star
by Archie Rand, illustrated by Archie Rand
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"As a book, it stands on its own rather than merely evoking a larger wall display, reaching a much wider audience in the process."
A monumental art project is transformed into wildly ambitious graphic literature. Read full book review >
THE LIGHT BETWEEN US by Laura Lynne Jackson
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"These candid, fascinating experiences impart significance and possibility to the science of psychic conveyance."
A psychic medium discusses her ability to communicate with the dead. Read full book review >

THE GOOD BOOK by Andrew Blauner
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A smug, disappointing collection."
A collection of essays—ranging from brief polemic to biography to short fiction—on the Bible. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"While more historical context would be useful, this is a provocative work of dogged investigative research."
An investigative report of the current pope's "revolution" to reform Vatican finances. Read full book review >
AUGUSTINE by Robin Lane Fox
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"An erudite and ordered reading of Augustine's Confessions and a worthy addition to any library on early Christianity."
A comprehensive literary biography of the great Christian thinker Augustine (354-430). Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Another deeply felt entry on two divergent, yet ultimately compatible, ways of engaging the world and understanding reality."
The New Atheists have it all wrong, insists McGrath (Science and Religion/Oxford Univ.; C.S. Lewis—A Life: Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >
THE GIVENNESS OF THINGS by Marilynne Robinson
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Deeply thoughtful essays on troubling and divisive cultural—and spiritual—issues."
A sober, passionate defense of Christian faith. Read full book review >
BETWEEN GODS by Alison Pick
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"A poignant and powerful memoir of family, religion, love, and healing."
An award-winning Canadian writer's account of how learning a family secret led her to embark on a journey of spiritual transformation and religious conversion. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An enchanting and addictive report shedding much-needed light on a spiritualistic community obfuscated by historical misinterpretation and pop-culture derision."
A self-avowed skeptic investigates the shadowy world of modern witchcraft. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >