Religion Book Reviews (page 11)

RELIGION
Released: April 12, 2016

"A lively, invaluable, and evaluative Bible reference work, for both believers and nonbelievers."
A debut book offers a comprehensive historical analysis of the events of the Old Testament. Read full book review >
The Forgotten Officer by Joe Kohler
RELIGION
Released: April 11, 2016

"A long-winded work about a radical but well-supported idea that has the potential to reinvigorate Christian churches across the nation."
A unique biblical interpretation of Ephesians 4:11-16 that looks at evangelists' role in the Christian church. Read full book review >

A JEWISH GUIDE IN THE HOLY LAND by Jackie Feldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2016

"An odd book but nonetheless a unique lens through which to view the conflicted Promised Land."
An Israeli tour guide considers the complicated methods, both academic and personal, of performing for Christian pilgrims. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial but illuminating journey in search of community and social justice."
An unbeliever embarks on an ambitious personal journey to sample the top four world religions, emerging more connected and less anxious. Read full book review >
TILL WE HAVE BUILT JERUSALEM by Adina Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lovers of Jerusalem will feel right at home as Hoffman brings a small bit of its history to life."
Hoffman (My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century, 2009, etc.) studies three very different architects responsible for the look of Jerusalem.Read full book review >

FULL MOON OVER NOAH’S ARK by Rick Antonson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A book filled with the enthusiasm of discovery, the delight in accomplishment, and the relief of return."
A veteran travel writer pursues an interest from childhood: Noah, the ark, and the landing. Read full book review >
BECOMING WISE by Krista Tippett
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A hopeful consideration of the human potential for enlightenment."
Five key words serve as guideposts in a search for wisdom. Read full book review >
SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE by Shelley Emling
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A worthwhile read, but expect nothing new on this saint."
A biography of St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). Read full book review >
How I Found Myself in Egypt by Subhanah Wahhaj
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2016

"A thought-provoking read, especially for those with a limited knowledge of Islam.

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A Muslim woman discusses the challenges of her faith, and her spiritual awakening, in this debut memoir. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"An astute study that should provoke productive conversations."
An exploration of the changing motivation behind American Jewish foreign policy and humanitarianism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"Though a balanced, objective study of the case would be useful and illuminating, Grumet does provide a readable look at the nitty-gritty of New York's political machine."
Post-mortem of an unusual Supreme Court case regarding the separation of church and state. Read full book review >
Sacred Prayers to God by Mick Pollitt
RELIGION
Released: March 30, 2016

"A prayer journal that lacks polish and an effective presentation."
Pollitt offers 500 prayers to God in this Christian volume. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >