Religion Book Reviews (page 11)

Released: Jan. 1, 2001

One of the boldest contributions to the history of the Holocaust in the last decade. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 6, 2000

"An important and necessary book."
A 35-acre plot in Jerusalem is the navel of the world, focus of theological geopolitics and gateway to Heaven in three great religious traditions. It may also be the most dangerous place on earth, as Israeli journalist Gorenberg demonstrates. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"An illuminating portrait of a still-obscure portion of the globe."
Eye-opening travels along a little-recognized fault line. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A rural canvas of extremes—from hard-bitten bigots to the naïve, the sure of faith, and the latitudinarians—disentangled by the author with deft, probing strokes."
Talk about strangers in a strange land: Bloom's story of the heartland Lubavitcher meatpackers and the waves they caused to ripple across the rural Iowan landscape is an immediate, elegantly personal piece of reportage. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 8, 2000

"The first book anyone should read this year about early Christianity."
With dazzling panache, Cambridge don Hopkins takes on one of the most intriguing questions of ancient history: how did Christianity, an obscure new faith whose leader was dead, triumph in the Roman empire? Read full book review >

LITTLE SAINT by Hannah Green
Released: July 10, 2000

"More learned than most travelogues, this fond remembrance of both a little girl who suffered for her faith and the people who work a stony land today is immensely appealing."
A rarity: a literal hagiography, but much more. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Angelou is always rewarded by what life gives back in her travels, and in sharing with us such perceptions chanced upon in rich solitude, she startles with her frank, fresh ability to relate in precise prose whatever she learns."
Angelou's (All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes, 1986, etc.) sixth work of autobiographical reflection again treads ballerina-like on the fine line dividing saying too much and not enough on a variety of heartfelt subjects. Read full book review >
LIVING FAITH by Jimmy Carter
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Carter's life is best summarized by the title of one of his chapters: faith in action."
An unforgettable spiritual autobiography filled with wisdom and pleas for justice. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"And he ceaselessly pricks the conscience of a world that thinks it is possible to have heard 'enough' about the Holocaust."
Drenched with sad yearning, yet narrated with simplicity in the limpid singsong that distinguishes his oral as well as written narrative, Wiesel's memoir reveals much, if not enough, about the man whose purpose in life has been to testify to the fate of his people. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1992

"Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth."
Bloom wanders a bit, away from Yale into "the Evening Land" of America and its churches—and reconstructs a remarkable diagram of the religious imagination. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 19, 1981

"But whether or not one accepts Naipaul's final judgment in its entirety (the leftist Behzads will multiply, he foresees), the journey proceeds on many challenging, absorbing levels."
Naipaul traveled from Iran to Pakistan, Malaysia, Indonesia, and back in 1979-80, seeking the meaning of "Islamization"—an exceptional writer/observer/commentator intersecting with an epic anti-intellectual, anti-modernist upheaval. Read full book review >
LOST IN AMERICA by Isaac Bashevis Singer
Released: June 5, 1981

"And despite the nonstop laments, this sharp, shapely memoir bounces along quite merrily—with the wicked, ironic grace of three or four overlapping Singer stories."
The Nobel Laureate continues his selective, semi-fictional memoirs—"contributions to an autobiography I never intend to write"—with a third, large-print volume illustrated by Raphael Soyer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marie Lu
September 29, 2015

In the second installment of Marie Lu’s Young Elites series, The Rose Society, Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her. But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness? “The direction of this trilogy's conclusion is left refreshingly difficult to predict,” our reviewer writes. View video >