Religion Book Reviews (page 11)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A rural canvas of extremes—from hard-bitten bigots to the naïve, the sure of faith, and the latitudinarians—disentangled by the author with deft, probing strokes."
Talk about strangers in a strange land: Bloom's story of the heartland Lubavitcher meatpackers and the waves they caused to ripple across the rural Iowan landscape is an immediate, elegantly personal piece of reportage. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 8, 2000

"The first book anyone should read this year about early Christianity."
With dazzling panache, Cambridge don Hopkins takes on one of the most intriguing questions of ancient history: how did Christianity, an obscure new faith whose leader was dead, triumph in the Roman empire? Read full book review >

LITTLE SAINT by Hannah Green
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 10, 2000

"More learned than most travelogues, this fond remembrance of both a little girl who suffered for her faith and the people who work a stony land today is immensely appealing."
A rarity: a literal hagiography, but much more. Read full book review >
EVEN THE STARS LOOK LONESOME by Maya Angelou
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Angelou is always rewarded by what life gives back in her travels, and in sharing with us such perceptions chanced upon in rich solitude, she startles with her frank, fresh ability to relate in precise prose whatever she learns."
Angelou's (All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes, 1986, etc.) sixth work of autobiographical reflection again treads ballerina-like on the fine line dividing saying too much and not enough on a variety of heartfelt subjects. Read full book review >
LIVING FAITH by Jimmy Carter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Carter's life is best summarized by the title of one of his chapters: faith in action."
An unforgettable spiritual autobiography filled with wisdom and pleas for justice. Read full book review >

ALL RIVERS RUN TO THE SEA by Elie Wiesel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"And he ceaselessly pricks the conscience of a world that thinks it is possible to have heard 'enough' about the Holocaust."
Drenched with sad yearning, yet narrated with simplicity in the limpid singsong that distinguishes his oral as well as written narrative, Wiesel's memoir reveals much, if not enough, about the man whose purpose in life has been to testify to the fate of his people. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth."
Bloom wanders a bit, away from Yale into "the Evening Land" of America and its churches—and reconstructs a remarkable diagram of the religious imagination. Read full book review >
AMONG THE BELIEVERS by V.S. Naipaul
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 19, 1981

"But whether or not one accepts Naipaul's final judgment in its entirety (the leftist Behzads will multiply, he foresees), the journey proceeds on many challenging, absorbing levels."
Naipaul traveled from Iran to Pakistan, Malaysia, Indonesia, and back in 1979-80, seeking the meaning of "Islamization"—an exceptional writer/observer/commentator intersecting with an epic anti-intellectual, anti-modernist upheaval. Read full book review >
LOST IN AMERICA by Isaac Bashevis Singer
RELIGION
Released: June 5, 1981

"And despite the nonstop laments, this sharp, shapely memoir bounces along quite merrily—with the wicked, ironic grace of three or four overlapping Singer stories."
The Nobel Laureate continues his selective, semi-fictional memoirs—"contributions to an autobiography I never intend to write"—with a third, large-print volume illustrated by Raphael Soyer. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 23, 1974

"Arendt's insight into the psychology and the situation of pariah and parvenu is essential."
Intellectual history as biography; and biography as the reconstruction from letters and diaries of the inner life and passions of a Jew disenfranchised on account of "infamous birth." Read full book review >
IN MY FATHER'S COURT by Isaac Bashevis Singer
RELIGION
Released: May 2, 1966

"Effortlessness is a quality of Singer's writing, as is its endemic richness- and the rightness for its material, and it reads with as much ease as it appears to be written."
Isaac Bashevis Singer's recollections of No. 10 Korochmalna Street in Warsaw where his father officiated as a rabbi and took on the legal duties of that estate, offers him ample opportunity to give scope to his portrayal of ghetto characters. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >