Religion Book Reviews (page 11)

Released: April 18, 2001

"A work of stunning scholarship and imagination whose appeal will be to determined readers rather than casual ones. (32 pages photographs, 16 color, not seen; 7 maps)"
A meticulous reconstruction of the final years of some persistent medieval Pyrenean heretics whose leaders—called "Perfects"—were eventually burned or otherwise dispersed by the equally relentless Inquisition. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2001

"Lucid, often surprisingly funny: a very welcome contribution to our understanding of this tragic nation."
An instructive memoir by an Afghan-American thrust into the news after September 11, 2001. Read full book review >

Released: March 20, 2001

"Literate and witty, full of memorable moments and keenly observed details: both wonderfully entertaining and highly instructive."
A superbly realized account of travels into Asia Incognita. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2001

"McDonough and Bianchi avoid a facile progressive triumphalism and deal quite forthrightly with the tensions and difficulties that both liberal and conservative agendas pose to the order: a highly interesting take on the future of the American church and its Jesuit elite."
A fascinating look at Catholicism's most prestigious order in a time of change and confusion. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

One of the boldest contributions to the history of the Holocaust in the last decade. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 6, 2000

"An important and necessary book."
A 35-acre plot in Jerusalem is the navel of the world, focus of theological geopolitics and gateway to Heaven in three great religious traditions. It may also be the most dangerous place on earth, as Israeli journalist Gorenberg demonstrates. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"An illuminating portrait of a still-obscure portion of the globe."
Eye-opening travels along a little-recognized fault line. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A rural canvas of extremes—from hard-bitten bigots to the naïve, the sure of faith, and the latitudinarians—disentangled by the author with deft, probing strokes."
Talk about strangers in a strange land: Bloom's story of the heartland Lubavitcher meatpackers and the waves they caused to ripple across the rural Iowan landscape is an immediate, elegantly personal piece of reportage. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 8, 2000

"The first book anyone should read this year about early Christianity."
With dazzling panache, Cambridge don Hopkins takes on one of the most intriguing questions of ancient history: how did Christianity, an obscure new faith whose leader was dead, triumph in the Roman empire? Read full book review >
LITTLE SAINT by Hannah Green
Released: July 10, 2000

"More learned than most travelogues, this fond remembrance of both a little girl who suffered for her faith and the people who work a stony land today is immensely appealing."
A rarity: a literal hagiography, but much more. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Angelou is always rewarded by what life gives back in her travels, and in sharing with us such perceptions chanced upon in rich solitude, she startles with her frank, fresh ability to relate in precise prose whatever she learns."
Angelou's (All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes, 1986, etc.) sixth work of autobiographical reflection again treads ballerina-like on the fine line dividing saying too much and not enough on a variety of heartfelt subjects. Read full book review >
LIVING FAITH by Jimmy Carter
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Carter's life is best summarized by the title of one of his chapters: faith in action."
An unforgettable spiritual autobiography filled with wisdom and pleas for justice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >